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See detailCompte rendu de Ph. Poirier (dir.), Les pouvoirs d’un parlement. La Chambre des députés du Luxembourg, Promoculture-Larcier, Windhof, 2014
Heuschling, Luc UL

in Hemecht : Zeitschrift für Luxemburger Geschichte = Revue d'Histoire Luxembourgeoise (in press)

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See detailCoercion-Resistant Voting in Linear Time via Fully Homomorphic Encryption: Towards a Quantum-Safe Scheme
Roenne, Peter UL; Atashpendar, Arash UL; Kristian, Gjøsteen et al

in Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2019. FC 2019: International Workshops, CIW, VOTING, and WTSC (in press)

We present an approach for performing the tallying work in the coercion-resistant JCJ voting protocol, introduced by Juels, Catalano, and Jakobsson, in linear time using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE ... [more ▼]

We present an approach for performing the tallying work in the coercion-resistant JCJ voting protocol, introduced by Juels, Catalano, and Jakobsson, in linear time using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE). The suggested enhancement also paves the path towards making JCJ quantum-resistant, while leaving the underlying structure of JCJ intact. The exhaustive, comparison-based approach of JCJ using plaintext equivalence tests leads to a quadratic blow-up in the number of votes, which makes the tallying process rather impractical in realistic settings with a large number of voters. We show how the removal of invalid votes can be done in linear time via a solution based on recent advances in various FHE primitives such as hashing, zero-knowledge proofs of correct decryption, verifiable shuffles and threshold FHE. We conclude by touching upon some of the advantages and challenges of such an approach, followed by a discussion of further security and post-quantum considerations. [less ▲]

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See detailResilience factors in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and their parents: the role of child and parent psychological flexibility.
Beeckman, Melanie; Hughes, Sean; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in Pain Medicine : The Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine (in press)

Objective: Chronic pain is central to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and is predictive of impaired functioning. Whereas most work has focused on identifying psychosocial risk factors for maladaptive ... [more ▼]

Objective: Chronic pain is central to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and is predictive of impaired functioning. Whereas most work has focused on identifying psychosocial risk factors for maladaptive outcomes, we explored the idea that child and parental psychological flexibility (PF) represent resilience factors for adaptive functioning of the child. We also explored differences between general versus pain-specific PF in contributing to child outcomes. Methods: Children with JIA (8-18 years) and (one of) their parents were recruited at the department of pediatric rheumatology at the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. They completed questionnaires assessing child and parent general and pain-specific PF and child psychosocial and emotional functioning, and disability. Results: The final sample consisted of fifty-nine children and forty-eight parents. Multiple regression analyses revealed that child PF contributed to better psychosocial functioning and less negative affect. Child pain acceptance contributed to better psychosocial functioning, lower levels of disability and lower negative affect, and also buffered against the negative influence of pain intensity on disability. Bootstrap mediation analyses demonstrated that parental (general) PF indirectly contributed to child psychosocial functioning and affect via the child’s (general) PF. Parent pain-specific PF was indirectly linked to child psychosocial functioning, disability, and negative affect via child pain acceptance. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that child and parental PF are resilience factors and show that pain acceptance buffers against the negative impact of pain intensity. Implications for psychosocial interventions that target (pain-specific) PF in children as well as in parents are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailA Critical Co/Autoethnographic Exploration of Self: Becoming Science Education Researchers in Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Landscapes
Park, Jennifer; Wilmes, Sara UL

in Bazzul, Jesse; Siry, Christina (Eds.) Critical voices in science education research: Narratives of academic journeys (in press)

In today’s globalized society, linguistic and cultural worlds collide bringing people, cultures, and languages together in diverse ways that can influence a person’s identity and sense of self. Due to the ... [more ▼]

In today’s globalized society, linguistic and cultural worlds collide bringing people, cultures, and languages together in diverse ways that can influence a person’s identity and sense of self. Due to the porous boundaries of people’s identities, increased globalization can lead to identity confusion, which can influence how open individuals are to integration (Hermans and Hermans-Konopka 2010). This confusion increases as countries across the world experience what Vertovec (2006) describes as super-diversity, a “world in one city” (Benedictus and Godwin 2005, p. 2). Super-diversity can be described as a dynamic interplay of variables among increasing numbers of new, small and scattered, multiple-origin, transnationally connected, socio-economically differentiated, and legally stratified number of immigrants throughout the world (Vertovec 2007). While some researchers have claimed that globalization can result in a loss of cultural diversity (Tomlinson 2003), the integration of plurilingual and pluricultural people in diverse contexts can also result in greater awareness of diversity. To understand the impact of globalization on an individual’s identity and sense of self, research can be a powerful tool. In particular, research that critically focuses on examining oneself can reveal new knowledge of the self that may inform one’s research endeavors. In this chapter, we share the process of collaborative autoethnography (co-autoethnography), that we used to individually and collaboratively examine and reflect upon our experiences at the start of our doctoral research paths. We used this critical methodology to help us make sense of our individual and collective experiences in two different multilingual/multicultural research settings – South Korea and Luxembourg. Specifically, we attempt to tease apart the relationship that exists between language, culture, and self. In addition, building from a discussion of the benefits and challenges of implementing this method, we share what we learned from this narrative process about ourselves, and about how we engaged and continued to engage in science education research. We share our co-autoethnographic process that helped us push the boundaries of our research, and that gave each of us a deeper understanding of our own positionality within our research contexts. We do so with the hopes of encouraging other researchers to undergo such processes in order to further investigate their own self and the position of their selves in their research. [less ▲]

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See detailGleanings from applications for the graph-based exploration of cultural heritage collections
During, Marten UL

in Kerschbaumer, Florian; Keyserlingk, Linda Von; Stark, Martin (Eds.) et al The Power of Networks. Prospects of Historical Network Research (in press)

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See detailInformation sharing, credit booms and financial stability: Do developing economies differ from advanced countries?
Leon, Florian UL; Guérineau, Samuel

in Journal of Financial Stability (in press)

This paper analyses the impact of credit information sharing on financial stability, drawing special attention to its interactions with credit booms. A probit estimation of financial vulnerability ... [more ▼]

This paper analyses the impact of credit information sharing on financial stability, drawing special attention to its interactions with credit booms. A probit estimation of financial vulnerability episodes—identified by jumps in the ratio of non-performing loans to total loans—is run for a sample of 159 countries divided into two sub-samples according to their level of development: 80 advanced or emerging economies and 79 less developed countries. The results show that: i) credit information sharing reduces financial fragility for both groups of countries; ii) for less developed countries, the main effect is the direct effect (reduction of NPL ratio once credit boom is controlled), suggesting a portfolio quality effect; iii) credit information sharing also mitigates the detrimental impact of a credit boom on financial fragility but this result holds only for advanced and emerging countries and for household credit booms; and iv) the depth of information sharing has a negative impact on the likelihood of credit booms (but not the coverage of IS). [less ▲]

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See detail‘État de droit’ : Why import the German term ‘Rechtsstaat’ ?
Heuschling, Luc UL

in Meierhenrich, Jens; Loughlin, Martin (Eds.) The Cambridge Companion to the Rule of Law (in press)

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See detailA transdiagnostic dimensional approach towards a neuropsychological assessment for addiction: an international Delphi consensus study.
Yucel, Murat; Oldenhof, Erin; Ahmed, Serge et al

in Addiction (Abingdon, England) (in press)

BACKGROUND: The U.S. National Institutes of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) seek to stimulate research into biologically validated neuropsychological dimensions across mental illness ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The U.S. National Institutes of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) seek to stimulate research into biologically validated neuropsychological dimensions across mental illness symptoms and diagnoses. The RDoC framework comprises 39 functional constructs designed to be revised and refined, with the overall goal to improve diagnostic validity and treatments. This study aimed to reach a consensus among experts in the addiction field on the 'primary' RDoC constructs most relevant to substance and behavioural addictions. METHODS: Forty-four addiction experts were recruited from Australia, Asia, Europe and the Americas. The Delphi technique was used to determine a consensus as to the degree of importance of each construct in understanding the essential dimensions underpinning addictive behaviours. Expert opinions were canvassed online over three rounds (97% completion rate), with each consecutive round offering feedback for experts to review their opinions. RESULTS: Seven constructs were endorsed by >/=80% of experts as 'primary' to the understanding of addictive behaviour: five from the Positive Valence System (Reward Valuation, Expectancy, Action Selection, Reward Learning, Habit); one from the Cognitive Control System (Response Selection/Inhibition); and one expert-initiated construct (Compulsivity). These constructs were rated to be differentially related to stages of the addiction cycle, with some more closely linked to addiction onset, and others more to chronicity. Experts agreed that these neuropsychological dimensions apply across a range of addictions. CONCLUSIONS: The study offers a novel and neuropsychologically informed theoretical framework, as well as a cogent step forward to test transdiagnostic concepts in addiction research, with direct implications for assessment, diagnosis, staging of disorder, and treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailBook review: Bessey, Valérie et Werner Paravicini: Guerre des manifestes : Charles le Téméraire et ses ennemis (1465-1475)
Genot, Gilles UL

in Hemecht: Zeitschrift für Luxemburger Geschichte (in press)

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See detailSelf-Regulation of Fundamental Rights? The EU Code of Conduct on Hate Speech, Related Initiatives and Beyond
Quintel, Teresa Alegra UL; Ullrich, Carsten UL

in Ojanen, Tuomas; Petkova, Bilyana (Eds.) Fundamental Rights Protection Online: the Future Regulation of Intermediaries (in press)

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards ... [more ▼]

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards fighting illegal content on online platforms, which ventures squarely into co-regulation. There is no formal and straightforward definition on what constitutes illegal hate speech. However, hate speech might be classified as targeting minority groups in a way that promotes violence or social disorder and hatred. The use of social media and online platforms to spread illegal content and hate speech has increased progressively during recent years, as content may be disseminated anonymously and further shared by other users. Therefore, the timely removal or blocking of access to illegal content is essential to limit the wider dissemination and harm of individuals targeted by hate speech. The prominent role of online platforms in revolutionizing modern communication and as influencers of the public opinion has increasingly come to the attention of policy makers. Since online platforms provide an important stage for phenomena such as ‘fake news’, ‘hate speech’ or ‘disinformation’, the pressure to take more responsibility over content hosted by them has grown. The EU Commission took action via several attempts to set certain rules for online intermediaries, mostly relying on non-binding agreements, often in the form of self-regulatory measures, such as codes of conduct, guidelines and recommendations. These measures have raised concerns regarding possible limitations of Freedom of Expression, because they require online platforms to adjudicate on the legality of content, often by relying on automated systems. Meanwhile decisions over the unlawfulness of hate speech and “disinformation” are often notoriously difficult. The deployment of algorithms to analyse the content generated on platforms, such as recognition and filtering technologies, bear risks and pitfalls of automated compliance solutions. Although the use of algorithms to monitor content online still happens based on the “human-in-the-loop principle”, the diligence and efficiency with which illegal content can be reviewed is also dependent on the financial capacity and resources of each company. In addition, these privatized removal procedures maybe influenced by commercial interests and lack effective appeals mechanisms. All these issues throw up serious questions about the democratic legitimacy of self-regulatory removal procedures An alternative solution, proposed in this article, would require platforms to apply a risk-based approach to preventing and removing illegal content. The norms and standards of such an approach would be based on duty of care and be subject to regulatory oversight. It is suggested that the current self-regulatory proposals be replaced by co-regulatory solutions. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying elastoplastic parameters with Bayes' theorem considering double error sources and model uncertainty
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Noels, Ludovic et al

in Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics (in press)

We discuss Bayesian inference for the identi cation of elastoplastic material parameters. In addition to errors in the stress measurements, which are commonly considered, we furthermore consider errors in ... [more ▼]

We discuss Bayesian inference for the identi cation of elastoplastic material parameters. In addition to errors in the stress measurements, which are commonly considered, we furthermore consider errors in the strain measurements. Since a difference between the model and the experimental data may still be present if the data is not contaminated by noise, we also incorporate the possible error of the model itself. The three formulations to describe model uncertainty in this contribution are: (1) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with constant parameters, (2) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with an input-dependent mean, and (3) a Gaussian random process with a stationary covariance function. Our results show that incorporating model uncertainty often, but not always, improves the results. If the error in the strain is considered as well, the results improve even more. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating fibres' material parameter distributions from limited data with the help of Bayesian inference
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL

in European Journal of Mechanics. A, Solids (in press)

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect ... [more ▼]

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect the structural behaviours of these discrete structures: geometrical randomness and material randomness. Identifying the material randomness is an experimentally demanding task, because many small fibres, yarns or struts need to be tested, which are not easy to handle. To avoid the testing of hundreds of constituents, this contribution proposes an identification approach that only requires a few dozen of constituents to be tested (we use twenty to be exact). The identification approach is applied to articially generated measurements, so that the identified values can be compared to the true values. Another question this contribution aims to answer is how precise the material randomness needs to be identified, if the geometrical randomness will also influence the macroscale behaviour of these discrete networks. We therefore also study the effect of the identified material randomness to that of the actual material randomness for three types of structures; each with an increasing level of geometrical randomness. [less ▲]

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See detailMaintenance location routing for rolling stock under line and fleet planning uncertainty
Arts, Joachim UL; Tönissen, Denise; Shen, Zuo-Jun

in Transportation Science (in press)

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See detailNew synthetic opioids: Part of a new addiction landscape.
Karila, Laurent; Marillier, Maude; Chaumette, Boris et al

in Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews (in press)

Synthetic opioids (SO) are a major risk for public health across the world. These drugs can be divided into 2 categories, pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical fentanyls. A new generation of SO has ... [more ▼]

Synthetic opioids (SO) are a major risk for public health across the world. These drugs can be divided into 2 categories, pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical fentanyls. A new generation of SO has emerged on the drug market since 2010. North America is currently facing an opioid epidemic of morbi-mortality, caused by over-prescription of opioids, illegally diverted prescribed medicines, the increasing use of heroin, is and the emergence of SO. Furthermore, this opioid crisis is also seen in Europe. SO are new psychoactive substances characterized by different feature such as easy availability on the Internet, low price, purity, legality, and lack of detection in laboratory tests. They have not been approved or are not recommended for human use. Opioid misuse is associated with somatic and psychiatric complications. For many substances, limited pharmacological information is available, increasing the risk of harmful adverse events. Health actors and the general population need to be clearly informed of the potential risks and consequences of the diffusion and use of SO. [less ▲]

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See detailFraming EU Executive Discretion in EU Law
Mendes, Joana UL

in Mendes, Joana (Ed.) EU Executive Discretion and the Limits of Law (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
See detailExecutive Discretion in the EU and the Outer Boundaries of Law
Mendes, Joana UL

in Mendes, Joana (Ed.) Eu Executive Discretion and the Limits of Law (in press)

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See detailLong-term finance and entrepreneurship
Leon, Florian UL

in Economic Systems (in press)

This paper investigates whether long-term finance affects firm entry worldwide. We construct a new database on short-term and long-term credit provided by commercial banks to the private sector in 85 ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates whether long-term finance affects firm entry worldwide. We construct a new database on short-term and long-term credit provided by commercial banks to the private sector in 85 countries over the period 1995-2014. We then analyze whether differences in entrepreneurship are related to the provision of short-term and long-term bank credit. Data on entrepreneurship are extracted from two frequently used databases: the Global Entrepreneurship Monitoring dataset and the Entrepreneurship Database, each of which captures different aspects of firm creation. Econometric results indicate that long-term credit does not stimulate firm entry. By contrast, we find that short-term credit is positively related to firm creation, from birth to registration. Controlling for potential endogeneity by implementing an instrumental variables approach does not affect our conclusions. Our findings suggest that better provision of short-term credit allows entrepreneurs to apply for formal loan instead of having to rely exclusively on informal loans or internal funds. The absence of impact of long-term loans can be explained by the difficulty entrepreneurs face in getting access to long-term credit. [less ▲]

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See detailArticle 216(1) TFEU and the Union’s shared external competence in the light of mixity
Neframi, Eleftheria UL

in Common Market Law Review (in press)

Case C-600/14, Germany v Council, (Amendment of the Convention concerning International Carriage by Rail –COTIF), Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber), of 5 December 2017, EU:C:2017:935. The COTIF case ... [more ▼]

Case C-600/14, Germany v Council, (Amendment of the Convention concerning International Carriage by Rail –COTIF), Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber), of 5 December 2017, EU:C:2017:935. The COTIF case gave the Court of Justice the opportunity to clarify the distinction between Article 3(2) TFEU and Article 216(1) TFEU and, thus, to address the question of facultative mixity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (1 UL)