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See detailSchulbuchentwicklung in Luxemburg: Forschungsergebnisse der TAPSE-Studie
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

in MENJE (Ministère de l’Éducation nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse); Université du Luxembourg (Eds.) Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2018 (in press)

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See detailEntwicklungen der Trans*-Bewegung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland
De Silva, Adrian UL

E-print/Working paper (in press)

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See detailOf princesses, paladins, and player motivations: Gender stereotypes and gendered perceptions in video games
Melzer, André UL

in Pietschmann, Daniel; Liebold, Benny; Lange, Benjamin (Eds.) et al Digital hunter-gatherers: An evolutionary psychology approach to digital games (in press)

Video games have been labeled a male space, and playing video games an activity created by men and for men (Fox & Tang, 2014; see also Lange & Schwab, this volume). The present chapter analyses the ... [more ▼]

Video games have been labeled a male space, and playing video games an activity created by men and for men (Fox & Tang, 2014; see also Lange & Schwab, this volume). The present chapter analyses the typical roles of male and female video game characters, their presentation in games, their effects, and how players perceive these characters. To this end, gender in video games will be analyzed on different levels. Although women and men share the same overall interest in playing video games as a medium for entertainment, they differ substantially with regard to genres and game titles they prefer. These gender differences have been attributed to the overrepresentation of male characters in video games, uninviting game contents that strongly rely on competition and physical aggression, and the stereotypical portrayal and scripted behavioral patterns of hyper-masculine or “macho” male and sexualized female game characters. The issue of gender portrayals in video games will be discussed in the light of theoretical considerations on evolved dispositions that differ by sex versus the social structural account that attributes sex differences to the differing placement of women and men in the social structure. It will be argued that both theoretical approaches make similar predictions regarding gender-specific video game preferences. [less ▲]

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See detail„Doing Science“: Erwerb von Kompetenzen im naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht der École fondamentale
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL; Siry, Christina; Wilmes, Sara

in MENJE (Ministère de l’Éducation nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse); Université du Luxembourg (Eds.) Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2018 (in press)

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See detailL’UNION EUROPEENNE ET LES ACCORDS DE LIBRE-ECHANGE NOUVELLE GENERATION QUELLE EFFICACITE D’ACTION D’UNE UNION A COMPETENCE LIMITEE ?
Neframi, Eleftheria UL

in Annuaire Français des Relations Internationales (in press)

New generation of free trade agreements (CETA, TTIP, agreements with Singapore, China, Vietnam, Japan i.e.) are the expression of the objective of making the European Union a global international actor ... [more ▼]

New generation of free trade agreements (CETA, TTIP, agreements with Singapore, China, Vietnam, Japan i.e.) are the expression of the objective of making the European Union a global international actor. The external action of the Union is however dependent on the principle of conferral and the division of competences with its Member States. It results from Opinion 2/15 of the Court of Justice that the EU competence to conclude the free trade agreement with Singapore is not exclusive, as long as provisions concerning non-direct investments and dispute settlement fall under the shared competence of the Union and its Member States. The limits of the Union’s external competence and the conclusion of a mixed agreement jeopardise the effectiveness of the Union’s external action. However, the objective of an efficient external action allows a novel interpretation of the scope of the Union’s competence in the field of common commercial policy, comprising sustainable development provisions, as well as of the conditions of exercise of shared external competences. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Dynamic of the EU Objectives in the Analysis of the External Competence
Neframi, Eleftheria UL

in Neframi, Eleftheria; Gatti, Mauro (Eds.) Constitutional Issues of EU External Relations Law (in press)

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See detailStatic load deflection experiment on a beam for damage detection using the Deformation Area Difference Method
Erdenebat, Dolgion UL; Waldmann, Danièle UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL

Scientific Conference (in press)

A reliable and safety infrastructure for both transport and traffic is becoming increasingly important today. The condition assessment of bridges remains difficult and new methods must be found to provide ... [more ▼]

A reliable and safety infrastructure for both transport and traffic is becoming increasingly important today. The condition assessment of bridges remains difficult and new methods must be found to provide reliable information. A meaningful in-situ assessment of bridges requires very detailed investigations which cannot be guaranteed by commonly used methods. It is known that the structural response to external loading is influenced by local damages. However, the detection of local damage depends on many factors such as environmental effects (e.g. temperature), construction layer (e.g. asphalt) and accuracy of the structural response measurement. Within the paper, a new so-called Deformation Area Difference (DAD) Method is presented. The DAD method is based on a load deflection experiment and does not require a reference measurement of initial condition. Therefore, the DAD method can be applied on existing bridges. Moreover, the DAD method uses the most modern technologies such as high precision measurement techniques and attempts to combine digital photogrammetry with drone applications. The DAD method uses information given in the curvature course from a theoretical model of the structure and compares it to real measurements. The paper shows results from a laboratory load-deflection experiment with a steel beam which has been gradually damaged at distinct positions. The load size is chosen so that the maximum deflection does not exceed the serviceability limit state. With the data obtained by the laboratory experiment, the damage degree, which can still be detected by the DAD method, is described. Furthermore, the influence of measurement accuracy on damage detection is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Meyer, Heinz-Dieter (2017): The Design of the University: German, American, and “World Class”. Abingdon: Routledge
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Comparative Education Review (in press)

By and large, we take our universities for granted. Indeed, the oldest have outlived political regimes of all kinds. This stimulating historical and comparative study exemplifies the importance of in ... [more ▼]

By and large, we take our universities for granted. Indeed, the oldest have outlived political regimes of all kinds. This stimulating historical and comparative study exemplifies the importance of in-depth experience and engagement with the cultural and structural environments in which some of the world’s greatest universities have over centuries incrementally developed and been embedded. This is crucial if we hope to understand the sources of their authority and myriad contributions to scientific knowledge and human flourishing. A neo-institutionalist scholar and multicultural citizen who fruitfully contributes to dialogues exploring core institutions in education and society on both sides of the Atlantic, Heinz-Dieter Meyer is uniquely placed to grapple with the complex processes of institutional learning and design that have made the German and American universities among the globally most productive. He also shows how they have influenced each other via the complex, yet crucial flows of inspired scholars and students carrying key idea(l)s with them for interpretation and application back home. The contributions of key actors, but also the outcomes of choices at critical junctures, such as the failure to establish a national state-funded university in the United States, take center stage in this engaging account of how the leaders of American universities adapted the German model, joining diverse concepts to design what has become the greatest uni-versity system in the world, yet one that remains nearly impossible to emulate due to the unique constellation of actors and institutional environment in which it developed. In eighteen chapters in four parts, The Design of the University: German, American, and “World Class” takes us from Göttingen and Berlin to Boston and to the world level as the scientific enterprise—and competition between scientists and the most crucial organizational form in which they conduct their experiments and make their arguments, the research university—becomes ever more global. Contributing to and inviting debate, Meyer’s main argument is that the American university has suc-ceeded based upon an institutional design—or, perhaps, a non-design—that on multiple levels facil-itates self-government and the identification of a niche within an extraordinarily large and differen-tiated higher education system. This is not a full-fledged historiographic treatment of a subject fa-vored by academics (permanently searching for reputational gains) and policymakers (as they in-creasingly launch research funding programs and evaluation systems to foster competition). Rather than a full-fledged sociology of science, this book creatively sketches the trajectories of German and American university development, emphasizing affinities as well as crucial differences, to ulti-mately argue that in fact “Humboldt’s most important ideas flourished in the American atmosphere of unrestricted institutional experimentation and vigorous self-government” (xiii). Interrogating what he calls the “design thinking” of eminent thinkers Adam Smith and Wilhelm von Humboldt, among others, Meyer traces the challenging, complex, and contingent learning processes in the adaptation of the German research university model to the American context, eventually becoming the most differentiated and “world-class” higher education system in the world. Asking about the reasons for the American university’s success, especially in comparison to the recent insti-tutional crisis of the German research university, albeit still extraordinarily productive, Meyer argues that this American meritocratic success story has institutional design (of self-government) at its heart. Enjoying the patronage of not one, but three major institutions—state, church, and market—the American university attained true autonomy and global preeminence through unparalleled wealth of patronage and an intricate system of checks and balances. In this line of argument, chart-ing the ascendancy from humble origins of what can hardly be called a system due its extraordinary diversity, Meyer concurs with David Labaree (2017), who’s A Perfect Mess [1] is a highly-suitable com-panion piece grounded in the history of American higher education. Contemporary architects of higher education policy globally, driven by the fantasy of “world class” labels, Meyer warns, have completely underestimated the “institutional, social, and political prerequisites that excellence in research and teaching require” (p. 4). Meyer begins his treatise, appropriately, in Göttingen, the site of Georgia Augusta University, where many leaders of American higher education, first and foremost Boston Brahmin George Ticknor, learned by doing, ensconced in a cosmopolitan center of learning and intellectual enlightenment. The blueprint included professionalized scholarship, the unification of research and teaching in seminars and lectures, freedom to choose among academic offerings, a vast library of scientific knowledge, and academic standing based on perpetual production of cutting-edge research judged by peers (p. 19). Instead of Adam Smith’s preferred instruments of competition, choice, and tuition-dependence, Wilhelm von Humboldt’s “design revolution” proposed “three unities” whose powerful integration could surpass the utilitarian logic prevalent then and now: “teaching and research; scien-tific discovery and moral formation (Bildung); scholarly autonomy and scholarly community” (p. 40). The book’s second part, on institutional learning, charts the institutional migration of the blueprint; the contested design options of Gymnasium, college, and graduate school (the latter ultimately the key to global preeminence); the lasting influence of Protestantism (here Meyer follows the arguments of Max Weber, Robert K. Merton, and Joseph Ben-David) and extraordinary educational philanthropy; the battle between those who would centralize, by establishing a national university, and those committed to local control; and finally the contrasting answers to the eternal question of vocational-ism—e.g., how should business be treated, as a sibling to medicine and law or as their distant cousin? The more education-enamored, democratically-inclined patrician elites of the American East Coast were, Meyer argues, radically different institution-builders than German scholars, French state nobility, or even Chinese mandarins: “No other class combined their respect for, and grand vision of, the civilizing role of learning with their economic resources and the realism needed to put their plans into practice” (p. 113). Building on philosophical and historical elaboration, the book’s third part on achieving self-government discusses the six American moves leading to institutional innovation. At organizational level, the German chair and institute give way to departments and discipline, the university presi-dent is no longer figurehead but chief executive, and independent boards of trustees, not govern-ment officials, have ultimate authority. The implications for individuals and organizations of these “design shifts” cannot be overstated. Anyone seeking to understand American higher education, with its phenomenal vertical and horizontal differentiation and on-going academic drift (“a snake-like procession” as David Riesman, to whom the book is dedicated, calls it), and its self-organized autonomy—supported by many philanthropists without the limiting control of a few state bureau-crats—will find this analysis illuminating. Embedded in civil society, “vigorous self-government is the historic design contribution of the American university” (p. 209)—and an achievement that must be guarded in an era in which university autonomy is at risk. In concluding, Meyer’s American opti-mistic and laudatory tone shifts back to Germanic critique and foreboding, identifying challenges and the contemporary struggles that threaten the unintentional masterpiece of institutional learning and diversity. Such justified hopes and fears must now give way to empirical studies of the extraor-dinary outputs in terms of scientific production and societal capabilities and well-being brought about by the continuous process of university Bildung—in Germany, the United States, and around the world. [1] David Labaree (2017), A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [less ▲]

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See detailChallenges in completing EMU: asymmetric competition vs fiscal harmonisation. A case study of the Benelux countries
Danescu, Elena UL

in Journal of Contemporary European Research [=JCER] (2019)

This paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition in the integrated economic space of EMU in completion, to pinpoint the positive and negative ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition in the integrated economic space of EMU in completion, to pinpoint the positive and negative factors at work via a case study of the Benelux countries – both founder members of the EU and pioneers of EMU – and to examine the impact on European and international regulations in the field. In particular, it will endeavour to provide a comprehensive interpretation of fiscal policy in the Benelux countries via a comparative approach and from a historical perspective. It will look at the development of respective domestic fiscal policies, driven by national interests and by membership of a Community that is subject to requirements in terms of harmonisation and taxation, but also by constant contact (and frequent clashes) with the multilateral international environment. [less ▲]

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See detailTheir ‘Apple of Discord’ or the Apple of Their Eye: How the British Secured Eastern Mediterranean and Western European Security, 1947-1948
Paravantis, Spero UL

in Kamouzis, Dimitris; Nafpliotis, Alexandros (Eds.) Αnglo-Hellenic relations in the 20th Century (2019)

This chapter examines the role the British policy in Greece played in the shift in American foreign policy that was manifested in 1947-48, that led directly to these alliances, namely the Western European ... [more ▼]

This chapter examines the role the British policy in Greece played in the shift in American foreign policy that was manifested in 1947-48, that led directly to these alliances, namely the Western European Union and NATO. To achieve this shift (which also included support of British strategic interests in the Eastern Mediterranean) this chapter argues that the British used Greece, first as a way to draw the United States further into European affairs, and then as a way to anchor the United States in Europe, achieving a guarantee of security for the Eastern Mediterranean and for Western Europe. Drawing on both published and unpublished British and American sources, this chapter will also examine perceptions of the conflicts in and about Greece, and what it represented for Western European and Eastern Mediterranean security, and Western ideas of democracy when confronted with supporting a right-wing Greek government. In so doing, it clarifies how American foreign policy changed from its pre-war focus on non-intervention, to the cold-war politics of containment and intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailSprachliche Voraussetzungen
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Kiel, Ewald; Herzig, Bardo; Maier, Uwe (Eds.) et al Handbuch Unterrichten in allgemeinbildenden Schulen (2019)

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See detailNew Migration of Families from Greece to Europe and Canada – Experiences and Interpretations of Family Members within the Context of Different Migration Societies and Educational Systems
Chatzidaki; Kirsch, Claudine UL; Panagiotopoulou, Argyro et al

Book published by Barbara Budrich - Reihe Inklusion Bildung Migration (2019)

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See detailInterculturality in intimate relationships: Conflicts and conflict regulation
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Dasch, Hannah Katharina

in Aleksic, Gabrijela (Ed.) Experiencing Culture in Intercultural Intimate Relationships (2019)

It is commonly known that experiencing conflict can have negative impact on an individuals’ physical and mental health. Especially in intimate relationships, conflict has great influence on the well-being ... [more ▼]

It is commonly known that experiencing conflict can have negative impact on an individuals’ physical and mental health. Especially in intimate relationships, conflict has great influence on the well-being of both partners. Since intercultural intimate relationships are associated with both exceptional obstacles and benefits, conflict behavior in those relationships is of substantial interest in this research project. The aim of this study is to investigate how conflicts in intimate relationships are affected by the partners’ cultural backgrounds and linguistic barriers. It further seeks to unravel how conflict resolution is approached in order to provide a broader knowledge base in this field. For the purpose of this research, four semi-structured interviews with two couples were conducted individually. Each couple was interviewed by a different researcher. Ensuing, the interviews were transcribed and afterwards the data was analyzed implementing qualitative content analyses. The results provide insight into different levels of relationship functioning, sources of conflict as well as conflict resolution. Therefore, the findings of this study may have important implications for clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailPierre Werner and Europe: The Family Archives Behind the Werner Report.
Danescu, Elena UL

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2018)

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See detailGermany, Greece and Poland: The Complicated story of Reparations and their impact on European (dis?) Integration,
Paravantis, Spero UL

in Paravantis, Spero (Ed.) BENELUX, Europe and the Cold War: Asymmetrical cold war power relations in the Integration process of Europe (2018)

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See detailBENELUX, Europe and the Cold War: Asymmetrical Cold War Power Relations and the Integration Process of Europe
Paravantis, Spero UL

Book published by IB Tauris (2018)

What was/is European security in the context of the Cold War? How was and is it conceived? What role did “non-powers” play in European security, and how did they help define it? These were the main ... [more ▼]

What was/is European security in the context of the Cold War? How was and is it conceived? What role did “non-powers” play in European security, and how did they help define it? These were the main questions discussed during the conference held by the C²DH in March 2017. This edited volume brings together the final, peer-reviewed contributions of the participants, and brings them together in a common publication. [less ▲]

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See detailLiebe - Krankheit - Wahn: Lyrische Spielarten im Minnesang
Bendheim, Amelie UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

„Die Liebe verwundet, die Liebe fesselt, die Liebe macht krank, die Liebe lässt schwach werden.“ Dieser ursprünglich theologisch geprägte Gedanke über die Gewalt der Liebe, lässt sich – auf seinen ... [more ▼]

„Die Liebe verwundet, die Liebe fesselt, die Liebe macht krank, die Liebe lässt schwach werden.“ Dieser ursprünglich theologisch geprägte Gedanke über die Gewalt der Liebe, lässt sich – auf seinen bildlichen Kern reduziert – in zahllosen Varianten in der Weltliteratur aufspüren. Eine besonders auffällige Form scheinen dabei jene Texte zu bieten, die Liebe nicht allein als Auslöser, sondern gar selbst als Krankheit darstellen – zumindest implizit, insofern der Zustand des Verliebtseins mit dem Zustand der Krankheit gleichgesetzt wird. Wohl bekannt sind die körperlichen Symptome dieses Liebeszustandes, die in ihrer klassischen Ausprägung im Erbleichen, Erröten, Zittern, in Sprachlähmung sowie im Bluten aus der Nase bestehen und im Mittelalter als minnesiech bezeichnet werden. Erscheint die Liebeskrankheit im Minnesang noch vornehmlich in metaphorischem Gebrauch (s. das gequälte Herz als Beispiel für den Schmerz der Minne), weisen spätere Wörterbucheinträge (vgl. hierzu die Lemmata ‚Liebesfieber’ oder ‚Jungfernkrankheit’) wiederum auf ein stärker körperlich-physiologisches und auch sexuell-erotisches Verständnis von Liebe hin. Krank macht die Minne nun vor allem – und dem mittelalterlichen medizinischen Duktus der Humoralpathologie folgend – dann, wenn das körperliche Begehren nicht befriedigt werden kann. Der hier skizzierte Vortrag will die Vorstellung von Krankheit in einem größeren semantischen Beziehungsgeflecht in den Blick nehmen, das sich in der mhd. Lyrik in bedeutender Weise hervortut: der Verbindung Liebe – Krankheit – Wahn. Der wân als zentrales Symptom der Minnekrankheit löst – so die hier zu erprobende These –den Geist vom versehrten Körper und definiert damit den Übergang von der körperlichen Krankheit(smetapher) zu einer seelischen Zustandsbeschreibung. Die sprachhistorische Herleitung von mhd. wân vermag diese Beobachtung weiter zu untermauern, insofern der Begriff ein zunächst wertneutrales, semantisch vielfältiges Bedeutungsspektrum impliziert, und sich mit ‚Hoffnung, Zuversicht oder Einbildungskraft’ ins Nhd. übertragen ließe. Im krankhaften Minne-wân öffnen sich Denkräume, denen der Minnesang eine literarische Ausgestaltung verleiht; Minne-wân führt damit nicht nur zu körperlicher Versehrtheit, sondern ist eben auch guoter wân, lieber wân, saelden wân – und damit einer der ersten ‚Testräume’ für die Erprobung gedanklicher Spielarten des lyrischen Ichs in der deutschen Dichtung überhaupt. [less ▲]

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See detailConstructions contestées et contrastées de la notion de terroir. Symbolique Politique, Savoir Scientifique, Typicité Culturale et Culturelle
Reckinger, Rachel UL

in Yengué, Louis; Stengel, Kilien (Eds.) Terroir viticole. Espace et figures de qualité (2018)

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See detailPromoting multilingualism and multiliteracies through storytelling: a case-study on the use of the app iTEO in preschools in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Breuer, Esther; Lindgren, E; Stavans, A (Eds.) et al Multilingual Literacy (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 UL)