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See detailTheater International III
Bloch, Natalie UL; Heimböckel, Dieter UL

Book published by Hydre Edition (in press)

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See detailCaring for the elderly: Effects on Family and Adolescents.
Schumacher, Anette UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (in press)

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See detailFundamental rights and constitutional identity(ies): limits or parameters of the EU constitutional governance?
Zinonos, Panagiotis UL

in European Governance and Sovereignty (in press)

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See detailReductions of algebraic integers II
Perucca, Antonella UL

in Proceedings of WINE2 (in press)

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See detailDifferent but Similar: Personality Traits of Surgeons and Internists. Results of a Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Stienen, Martin N.; Scholtes, Felix; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in BMJ Open (in press)

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified physicians. Design: Prospective, observational. Setting: Online survey containing the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), an international-ly validated measure of the Five Factor Model of personality dimensions, distributed to board-certified physicians, residents and medical students in several European countries and Cana-da. Differences in personality profiles were analyzed using MANOVA and Canonical Linear Discriminant Analysis on age- and sex-standardized z-scores of the personality traits. Single personality traits were analyzed using robust t-tests. Participants: The TIPI was completed by 2345 board-certified physicians, 1453 residents and 1350 medical students, who also provided demographic information. Interventions: None. Results: Normal population and board-certified physicians’ personality profiles differed (P<0.001). The latter scored higher on conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, but lower on neuroticism (all P<0.001). There was no difference in openness to experience. Board-certified surgical and medical doctors’ personality profiles were also different (P<0.001). Surgeons scored higher on extraversion (P=0.003) and openness to experience (P=0.002), but lower on neuroticism (P<0.001). There was no difference in agreeableness and conscientiousness. These differences in personality profiles were reproduced at other levels of training, i.e., in students and training physicians engaging in surgical versus medical practice. Conclusion: These results indicate the existence of a distinct and consistent average “physi-cian personality”. Despite high variability within disciplines, there are moderate, but solid and reproducible differences between surgical and medical specialties. [less ▲]

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See detailO-MI/O-DF vs. MQTT: a performance analysis
Benedick, Paul-Lou UL; Robert, Jérémy UL; Le Traon, Yves UL et al

in O-MI/O-DF vs. MQTT: a performance analysis (in press)

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Industrial CPS or even Industry 4.0. Unfortunately, today’s IoT as ... [more ▼]

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Industrial CPS or even Industry 4.0. Unfortunately, today’s IoT as well as Industry 4.0 environments, look more like a collection of isolated “Intranets of Things”, also referred to as “vertical silos”, rather than a federated infrastructure. Breaking down these silos is a key challenge in both the IoT and Industry 4.0 communities. This paper is intended to present and discuss two open and standardised mes- saging protocols designed for IoT applications, namely: MQTT and O-MI/O-DF. First, a traffic load’s analytical model derived from the MQTT standard specifications is presented. Second, a comparison study between MQTT and O-MI/O-DF standards is carried out based on a real-life industrial implementation. This study brings a deep understanding of the extent to which these protocols are performant (from a traffic load perspective) and how they can impact on future architectural designs. [less ▲]

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See detailKommunale Selbstinszenierung im vorstädtischen Raum. Ein neuer Blick auf Leprosorien des Spätmittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

in Hesse, Christian; Schulte, Daniela; Stercken, Martina (Eds.) Kommunale Selbstinszenierung (in press)

Abstract zur Tagung „Kommunale Selbstinszenierung“ der Internationalen Kommission für Stadtgeschichte, des Schweizerischen Arbeitskreises für Stadtgeschichte und des NCCR 'Mediality. Historical ... [more ▼]

Abstract zur Tagung „Kommunale Selbstinszenierung“ der Internationalen Kommission für Stadtgeschichte, des Schweizerischen Arbeitskreises für Stadtgeschichte und des NCCR 'Mediality. Historical Perspectives' Universität Zürich, 3./4./5. September 2015 Martin Uhrmacher (Universität Luxemburg) „Leprosorien als kommunale Repräsentationsbauten im vorstädtischen Raum. Ein neuer Blick auf eine bisher wenig beachtete städtische Baugattung“ Die vor den Mauern mittelalterlicher und frühneuzeitlicher Städte gelegenen Leprosorien werden heute zumeist noch immer als abgelegene und verborgene Orte der Exklusion angesehen, durch Zäune und Mauern von der Außenwelt getrennt. Dementsprechend wird auch der Baugattung „Leprosorium“ nur wenig architektonischer Wert zugebilligt, wie bspw. im Ausstellungskatalog „Aussatz – Lepra – Hansen-Krankheit: Demnach hatten sie „keinerlei repräsentative Bedeutung, im Gegenteil: eher unauffällig sollten sie sein, verborgen vor dem Blick der Stadtbewohner und Reisenden“. Im 2005 von Monika Escher und Frank G. Hirschmann publizierten Syntheseband „Die urbanen Zentren des hohen und späten Mittelalters“ zur Geschichte mittelalterlicher Städte zwischen Rhein und Maas werden Leprosorien zudem als „nicht wertungsrelevantes“ Urbanitäts- und Zentralitätskriterium“ bezeichnet; begründet mit der angeblichen „Tatsache, daß in der Regel der topographische Bezug zur Stadt gering war“. In der jüngeren Forschung hat sich diese Einschätzung nun grundlegend gewandelt. Leprosorien gelten aufgrund ihrer besonders prominent und exponiert ausgewählten Standorte an Kreuzungen, Brücken und Hauptausfallstraßen als präsente und das städtische Umland prägende kommunale Einrichtungen, die ein fester Bestandteil der städtischen Lebenswelt waren. Sie dienten nicht dazu, ihre Bewohner zu verstecken, sondern waren vielmehr mit Stiftungen und Spenden versehene städtische Einrichtungen, die vom Rat und den Bürgern auch als Prestigeobjekte betrachtet wurden. Anhand ausgewählter Beispiele wird aufgezeigt, wie Leprosorien als Repräsentationsobjekte der Stadtgemeinden auch dem bürgerlichen Selbstverständnis Ausdruck verliehen. [less ▲]

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See detailSoftware Engineering Research and Industry: A Symbiotic Relationship to Foster Impact
Basili, Victor; Briand, Lionel UL; Bianculli, Domenico UL et al

in IEEE Software (in press)

Software engineering is not only an increasingly challenging endeavor that goes beyond the intellectual capabilities of any single individual engineer, but is also an intensely human one. Tools and ... [more ▼]

Software engineering is not only an increasingly challenging endeavor that goes beyond the intellectual capabilities of any single individual engineer, but is also an intensely human one. Tools and methods to develop software are employed by engineers of varied backgrounds within a large variety of organizations and application domains. As a result, the variation in challenges and practices in system requirements, architecture, and quality assurance is staggering. Human, domain and organizational factors define the context within which software engineering methodologies and technologies are to be applied and therefore the context that research needs to account for, if it is to be impactful. This paper provides an assessment of the current challenges faced by software engineering research in achieving its potential, a description of the root causes of such challenges, and a proposal for the field to move forward and become more impactful through collaborative research and innovation between public research and industry. [less ▲]

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See detailNeue Staaten – neue Grenzen. Die Rhein-Maas-Mosel-Region zwischen den Grenzbereinigungen des Ancien Régime und der Neuordnung durch den Wiener Kongress (1779 – 1816)
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

in Fickers, Andreas; Franz, Norbert; Laux, Stephan (Eds.) et al Repression, Reform und Neuordnung im Zeitalter der Revolutionen: Die Folgen des Wiener Kongresses für Westeuropa. Tagung und Workshop zum 200. Jahrestag des Abschlusses des Wiener Kongresses (in press)

Abstract Konferenz 200 Jahre Wiener Kongress Martin Uhrmacher Neue Staaten – neue Grenzen. Die Großregion zwischen den Grenzbereinigungen des Ancien Régime und der Neuordnung durch den Wiener Kongress ... [more ▼]

Abstract Konferenz 200 Jahre Wiener Kongress Martin Uhrmacher Neue Staaten – neue Grenzen. Die Großregion zwischen den Grenzbereinigungen des Ancien Régime und der Neuordnung durch den Wiener Kongress (1779 – 1816). Der Vortrag untersucht die Veränderung von Grenzen und Ihre Entwicklung von sich teils überlagernden und durch Enklaven und Gemeinsherrschaften durchsetzten historisch gewachsenen Grenzsäumen hin zu begradigten, fest definierten und teils naturräumlichen Scheidelinien folgenden Staatsgrenzen. In der heutigen Großregion vollzog sich dieser fundamentale Wandel in nur drei Jahrzehnten: Er gliederte die Region vollkommen neu. Zunächst waren es 1779 mit dem Brüsseler Vertrag nach jahrzehntelangen Verhandlungen endlich zu einem Ausgleich zwischen Österreich und Frankreich gekommen, der die Grenzstreitigkeiten beseitigte und neue, begradigte Grenzen exakt festlegte. Ein ähnlicher Vertrag wurde auch zwischen Österreich und Kurtrier abgeschlossen. Doch die als endgültig geplanten Regelungen bestanden nur wenige Jahre: Infolge der französischen Revolution annektierte die französische Republik am 1. Oktober 1795 die österreichischen Niederlande mit dem Herzogtum Luxemburg und kurz darauf auch Kurtrier und die anderen linksrheinischen Territorien. Alle Staaten wurden aufgelöst und gehörten nun zum französischen Staatsgebiet; Teile der alten Grenzen bestanden als Départementsgrenzen weiter. Nach der Absetzung Napoleons beschloss der Wiener Kongress 1815 eine Neuordnung Europas. Doch im Maas-Moselraum blieben mit Ausnahme Frankreichs alle Territorien und Landesherrschaften, die hier seit dem Früh- und Hochmittelalter bestanden hatten verschwunden. Sie wurden ersetzt durch das neu gegründete Großherzogtum Luxemburg und das ebenfalls neu gegründete Königreich der Vereinigten Niederlande sowie durch die preußische Rheinprovinz, die den gesamten östlichen Teil umfasste. Bei der territorialen Neugliederung griff man in Teilen auf die bis 1795 bestehenden Grenzen des alten Herzogtums zurück. In der Schlussakte des Wiener Kongresses behandeln die Artikel 66 bis 69 das Großherzogtum Luxemburg. Hier werden die Grenzen des neuen Staates allerdings nur grob umrissen; detaillierte Regelungen blieben späteren Verträgen vorbehalten. Unstrittig war die Süd- und Westgrenze mit Frankreich; sie entsprach der 1769/79 festgesetzten und bis 1795 gültigen Linie mit Ausnahme des ehemaligen Herzogtums Bouillon als Zugewinn. Vollkommen neu festgelegt wurde jedoch die Ostgrenze: Mit der Schlussakte des Wiener Kongresses waren alle hier an Luxemburg angrenzenden Gebiete an das Königreich Preußen gefallen. In den Verträgen von Aachen (26. Juni 1816) und Kleve (7. Oktober 1816) einigten sich die niederländische und die preußische Seite darauf, dass die Flussläufe von Mosel, Sauer und Our zukünftig die gemeinsame Grenze bildeten. Hier offenbart sich ein grundlegender Wandel im Verständnis und der Genese von Grenzen: Bisher waren territoriale Veränderungen auf Grundlage historisch gewachsener Herrschaftsstrukturen vorgenommen worden. So konnten kleinere Herrschaften aber auch größere Gebietskonglomerate zwar durch Tausch, Verkauf, Abtretung oder - wie durch Frankreich praktiziert - als „Reunionen“ die territoriale Zugehörigkeit wechseln. Dabei wurden jedoch die historisch gewachsenen Grenzen beachtet, sogar noch bei der Einrichtung der französischen Départements 1795. Mit der Wahl des Flußverlaufs von Sauer und Our als Grenze zwischen Luxemburg und Preußen wurde dieses Prinzip durchbrochen und ein naturräumliches Gliederungselement als neu geschaffene Grenze gewählt. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Meyer, Heinz-Dieter (2017): The Design of the University: German, American, and “World Class”. Abingdon: Routledge
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Comparative Education Review (in press)

By and large, we take our universities for granted. Indeed, the oldest have outlived political regimes of all kinds. This stimulating historical and comparative study exemplifies the importance of in ... [more ▼]

By and large, we take our universities for granted. Indeed, the oldest have outlived political regimes of all kinds. This stimulating historical and comparative study exemplifies the importance of in-depth experience and engagement with the cultural and structural environments in which some of the world’s greatest universities have over centuries incrementally developed and been embedded. This is crucial if we hope to understand the sources of their authority and myriad contributions to scientific knowledge and human flourishing. A neo-institutionalist scholar and multicultural citizen who fruitfully contributes to dialogues exploring core institutions in education and society on both sides of the Atlantic, Heinz-Dieter Meyer is uniquely placed to grapple with the complex processes of institutional learning and design that have made the German and American universities among the globally most productive. He also shows how they have influenced each other via the complex, yet crucial flows of inspired scholars and students carrying key idea(l)s with them for interpretation and application back home. The contributions of key actors, but also the outcomes of choices at critical junctures, such as the failure to establish a national state-funded university in the United States, take center stage in this engaging account of how the leaders of American universities adapted the German model, joining diverse concepts to design what has become the greatest uni-versity system in the world, yet one that remains nearly impossible to emulate due to the unique constellation of actors and institutional environment in which it developed. In eighteen chapters in four parts, The Design of the University: German, American, and “World Class” takes us from Göttingen and Berlin to Boston and to the world level as the scientific enterprise—and competition between scientists and the most crucial organizational form in which they conduct their experiments and make their arguments, the research university—becomes ever more global. Contributing to and inviting debate, Meyer’s main argument is that the American university has suc-ceeded based upon an institutional design—or, perhaps, a non-design—that on multiple levels facil-itates self-government and the identification of a niche within an extraordinarily large and differen-tiated higher education system. This is not a full-fledged historiographic treatment of a subject fa-vored by academics (permanently searching for reputational gains) and policymakers (as they in-creasingly launch research funding programs and evaluation systems to foster competition). Rather than a full-fledged sociology of science, this book creatively sketches the trajectories of German and American university development, emphasizing affinities as well as crucial differences, to ulti-mately argue that in fact “Humboldt’s most important ideas flourished in the American atmosphere of unrestricted institutional experimentation and vigorous self-government” (xiii). Interrogating what he calls the “design thinking” of eminent thinkers Adam Smith and Wilhelm von Humboldt, among others, Meyer traces the challenging, complex, and contingent learning processes in the adaptation of the German research university model to the American context, eventually becoming the most differentiated and “world-class” higher education system in the world. Asking about the reasons for the American university’s success, especially in comparison to the recent insti-tutional crisis of the German research university, albeit still extraordinarily productive, Meyer argues that this American meritocratic success story has institutional design (of self-government) at its heart. Enjoying the patronage of not one, but three major institutions—state, church, and market—the American university attained true autonomy and global preeminence through unparalleled wealth of patronage and an intricate system of checks and balances. In this line of argument, chart-ing the ascendancy from humble origins of what can hardly be called a system due its extraordinary diversity, Meyer concurs with David Labaree (2017), who’s A Perfect Mess [1] is a highly-suitable com-panion piece grounded in the history of American higher education. Contemporary architects of higher education policy globally, driven by the fantasy of “world class” labels, Meyer warns, have completely underestimated the “institutional, social, and political prerequisites that excellence in research and teaching require” (p. 4). Meyer begins his treatise, appropriately, in Göttingen, the site of Georgia Augusta University, where many leaders of American higher education, first and foremost Boston Brahmin George Ticknor, learned by doing, ensconced in a cosmopolitan center of learning and intellectual enlightenment. The blueprint included professionalized scholarship, the unification of research and teaching in seminars and lectures, freedom to choose among academic offerings, a vast library of scientific knowledge, and academic standing based on perpetual production of cutting-edge research judged by peers (p. 19). Instead of Adam Smith’s preferred instruments of competition, choice, and tuition-dependence, Wilhelm von Humboldt’s “design revolution” proposed “three unities” whose powerful integration could surpass the utilitarian logic prevalent then and now: “teaching and research; scien-tific discovery and moral formation (Bildung); scholarly autonomy and scholarly community” (p. 40). The book’s second part, on institutional learning, charts the institutional migration of the blueprint; the contested design options of Gymnasium, college, and graduate school (the latter ultimately the key to global preeminence); the lasting influence of Protestantism (here Meyer follows the arguments of Max Weber, Robert K. Merton, and Joseph Ben-David) and extraordinary educational philanthropy; the battle between those who would centralize, by establishing a national university, and those committed to local control; and finally the contrasting answers to the eternal question of vocational-ism—e.g., how should business be treated, as a sibling to medicine and law or as their distant cousin? The more education-enamored, democratically-inclined patrician elites of the American East Coast were, Meyer argues, radically different institution-builders than German scholars, French state nobility, or even Chinese mandarins: “No other class combined their respect for, and grand vision of, the civilizing role of learning with their economic resources and the realism needed to put their plans into practice” (p. 113). Building on philosophical and historical elaboration, the book’s third part on achieving self-government discusses the six American moves leading to institutional innovation. At organizational level, the German chair and institute give way to departments and discipline, the university presi-dent is no longer figurehead but chief executive, and independent boards of trustees, not govern-ment officials, have ultimate authority. The implications for individuals and organizations of these “design shifts” cannot be overstated. Anyone seeking to understand American higher education, with its phenomenal vertical and horizontal differentiation and on-going academic drift (“a snake-like procession” as David Riesman, to whom the book is dedicated, calls it), and its self-organized autonomy—supported by many philanthropists without the limiting control of a few state bureau-crats—will find this analysis illuminating. Embedded in civil society, “vigorous self-government is the historic design contribution of the American university” (p. 209)—and an achievement that must be guarded in an era in which university autonomy is at risk. In concluding, Meyer’s American opti-mistic and laudatory tone shifts back to Germanic critique and foreboding, identifying challenges and the contemporary struggles that threaten the unintentional masterpiece of institutional learning and diversity. Such justified hopes and fears must now give way to empirical studies of the extraor-dinary outputs in terms of scientific production and societal capabilities and well-being brought about by the continuous process of university Bildung—in Germany, the United States, and around the world. [1] David Labaree (2017), A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [less ▲]

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See detailLe droit et l'art contemporain : visées heuristiques et critiques
Bélanger, André; Dufour, Pascale UL

in Bernatchez, Stéphane; Lalonde, Louise (Eds.) Approches et fondements du droit (in press)

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See detail„Doing Science“: Erwerb von Kompetenzen im naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht der École fondamentale
Siry, Christina UL; Andersen, Katja Natalie UL; Wilmes, Sara UL

in MENJE (Ministère de l’Éducation nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse); Université du Luxembourg (Eds.) Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2018 (in press)

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See detailReductions of one-dimensional tori II,
Perucca, Antonella UL

in Proceedings of WINE2 (in press)

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See detailÉcriture du genre, genre de l'écriture
Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène UL

Book published by Peter Lang (in press)

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See detailMobilising knowledge at the science-policy interface: ‘Humanity on the Move’
Hesse, Markus UL

in Grubbauer, Monika; Shaw, Kate (Eds.) Across Theory and Practice: Thinking through Urban Research (in press)

In this chapter, I discuss the interplay of urban theory and practice in the context of the science-policy interface: a space of mutual engagement of research and related practices in the urban arena. My ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, I discuss the interplay of urban theory and practice in the context of the science-policy interface: a space of mutual engagement of research and related practices in the urban arena. My case study analyses the work of the German Advisory Council on Global Change (Wissenschaftlicher Beirat der Bundesregierung Globale Umweltveränderungen, WBGU), most notably its 2016 report on global urbanisation (WBGU 2016). By presenting the big narrative of the planet becoming entirely urbanised, there is a certain positivism and essentialism underlying this report that fails to acknowledge political conflict and what went wrong in the past. This contradicts the lofty political ambitions of the advisory council. I conclude that the WGBU’s policy advice and consultation is limited because it does not consider the murky and messy nature of politics and, thus, does not provide sufficient orientation for practice. This case study therefore illustrates the difficulties and problems when research and practice interact. [less ▲]

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See detailJoint Precoding and On-Board Beamforming for Multiple gateway Multibeam Satellite Systems
Joroughi, Vahid UL

in Submitted to IEEE Journal on Selected topic in Communication (JSAC) (in press)

This paper aims to design joint precoding and onboard beamforming of a multiple gateway multibeam satellite system, either in a hybrid space-ground mode, or in a totally on-board one. In such an ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to design joint precoding and onboard beamforming of a multiple gateway multibeam satellite system, either in a hybrid space-ground mode, or in a totally on-board one. In such an architecture, with employing high throughput full frequency reuse pattern over both user and feeder links, each gateway serves a cluster of adjacent beams such that the adjacent clusters are served through a set of gateways that are located at different geographical areas. However, such a system brings in two challenges to overcome. First, the interference in both user and feeder links is the bottleneck of the whole system and applying interference mitigation techniques becomes necessary. Second, as the data demand increases, the ground and space segments should employ extensive bandwidth resources in the feeder link accordingly. This entails embedding an extra number of gateways aiming to support a fair balance between the increasing demand and the corresponding required feeder link resources. To solve these problems, this study investigates the impact of employing a joint multiple gateway architecture and on-board beamforming scheme. It is shown that by properly designing the on-board beamforming scheme, the number of gateways can be kept affordable even if the data demand increases. Moreover, Zero Forcing (ZF) precoding techniques are considered to cope with the interference in both user and feeder links which embed in the following premises: (i) each gateway constructs a part of block ZF precoding matrix, (ii) the satellite and gateways perform the precoding scheme, and (iii) a joint design of ZF precoding and on-board beamforming at the payload of the satellite so that no signal processing scheme is conceived at the gateways. The provided simulation results depict the performance gain obtained by our proposed schemes. [less ▲]

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See detailPain and Attention: Towards a Motivational Account
van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Crombez, Geert

Book published by Oxford University Press (in press)

Attention plays a pivotal role in the experience of pain and its impact upon daily activities. Accordingly, research on the interplay between attention and pain has a long scientific history. Within this ... [more ▼]

Attention plays a pivotal role in the experience of pain and its impact upon daily activities. Accordingly, research on the interplay between attention and pain has a long scientific history. Within this chapter, we discuss the theoretical frameworks that aim to explain the relationship between attention and pain. We argue for a motivational perspective on pain that highlights the critical role of cognitive, affective and contextual factors in explaining the interplay between attention and pain. To substantiate this argument, we provide an overview of available research addressing the bottom-up capture of attention by pain and the top-down modulation (both inhibition and facilitation) of attention for pain. We conclude this chapter with guidelines and suggestions for future research and discuss clinical implications of adopting a motivational perspective on pain. [less ▲]

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See detailConclusion à Criminelles
Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène UL; Freyheit, Matthieu

in Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène; Freyheit, Matthieu (Eds.) Criminelles. Pourquoi les femmes tuent (in press)

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