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See detailY wie Ybalon
Heimböckel, Dieter UL

Article for general public (2013)

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See detailYactul: An Extensible Game-Based Student Response Framework for Active Learning
Grevisse, Christian UL; Botev, Jean UL; Rothkugel, Steffen UL

in Ponencias del XVIII Encuentro Internacional Virtual Educa, Colombia 2017 (2017)

Student response systems as an active learning strategy have shown to be useful in different study domains. With the advent of gamification, these environments have become very popular to improve student ... [more ▼]

Student response systems as an active learning strategy have shown to be useful in different study domains. With the advent of gamification, these environments have become very popular to improve student engagement. However, existing solutions only provide a static set of activity types and limit their use to classrooms. In this paper, we present Yactul, an extensible game-based student response framework for active learning. Our ecosystem fosters continuous learning both in the collaborative setting of the classroom and the private study environment of the student. Our modular architecture enables a seamless integration of activities from a broad and extensible set. In addition, a mobile app for offline learning extends the experience outside the classroom and allows to replay quizzes anywhere and anytime, track the progress of an individual learner and suggest activities on topics that require more studying. [less ▲]

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See detailYang-Mills fields and random holonomy along Brownian bridges
Arnaudon, Marc; Thalmaier, Anton UL

in Annals of Probability (2003), 31(2), 769-790

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See detailYearbook of Idiographic Science 2010 Vol 3
Salvatore, S.; Valsiner, J.; Gennaro, A. et al

Book published by Firera & Liuzzo Publishing (2010)

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See detailYes and PI3K bind CD95 to signal invasion of glioblastoma.
Kleber, Susanne; Sancho-Martinez I; Wiestler B et al

in Cancer Cell (2008), 13

Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma ... [more ▼]

Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma infiltration. Tumor interaction with the surrounding brain tissue induces CD95 Ligand expression. Binding of CD95 Ligand to CD95 on glioblastoma cells recruits the Src family member Yes and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to CD95, which signal invasion via the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta pathway and subsequent expression of matrix metalloproteinases. In a murine syngeneic model of intracranial GBM, neutralization of CD95 activity dramatically reduced the number of invading cells. Our results uncover CD95 as an activator of PI3K and, most importantly, as a crucial trigger of basal invasion of glioblastoma in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailYes I can: The Role of self-efficacy in diabetes care
Recchia, Sophie; Steffgen, Georges UL; Spitz, Elisabeth

in Psychology & Health (2010), 25(1), 137-376

Based on the assumptions of social cognitive theory and self-regulation theory, the present study aimed at exploring psychosocial factors in self-care of diabetes (Edgar & Skinner, 2003; Iannotti et al ... [more ▼]

Based on the assumptions of social cognitive theory and self-regulation theory, the present study aimed at exploring psychosocial factors in self-care of diabetes (Edgar & Skinner, 2003; Iannotti et al., 2006; Nouwen et al., 2009). The study sample comprised N 1⁄4 99 patients with type 1 diabetes aged between 12 and 39 years. Participants completed the diabetes self-efficacy scale, the brief illness perceptions questionnaire, the WHO-five index and the summary of diabetes self-care activities scale. Results showed that illness perceptions (i.e. perceived consequences (r1⁄4􏰆0.28), personal control (r1⁄40.24), treatment control (r1⁄40.27), compre- hension (r1⁄40.27) and emotional response (r1⁄40.27)), as well as well-being (r1⁄40.42) and perceived diabetes self-efficacy (r 1⁄4 0.55) were significantly correlated with self-care. Furthermore, stepwise regression analyses elucidated self-efficacy (􏰈1⁄40.44) to be the most powerful predictor of self-care, as illness perceptions and well-being became non significant when introducing self-efficacy. Moreover, self-efficacy completely mediated the effect of well- being on self-care (Sobel t 1⁄4 3.74, p50.01). As for clinical implications of these results, it can be suggested that a stronger emphasise should be given on fostering patients’ confidence in their ability to effectively manage their diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailYet another proof of the Nualart-Peccati criterion
Nourdin, Ivan UL

in Electronic Communications in Probability (2011), 16

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See detailYoko Ono und die Macht der Kunst
Marmulla, Henning UL

Presentation (2014, March 25)

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See detailYoko Ono und die Macht der Kunst. Gedanken zu einer Kunst der Irritation
Marmulla, Henning UL

in Gilcher-Holtey, Ingrid (Ed.) Eingreifende Denkerinnen. Weibliche Intellektuelle im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert (2015)

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See detailYolanda von Vianden
Peporte, Pit UL

in Kmec, Sonja; Péporté, Pit (Eds.) Lieux de mémoire au Luxembourg. Vol. 2: Jeux d'échelles (2012)

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See detailYolanda von Vianden und das Yolanda-Epos
Sieburg, Heinz UL

E-print/Working paper (in press)

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See detailYou-Tube and the Internet. A Tool for Music Educators and for Auto-Didactic Music Learners?
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2012, April 21)

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See detailYoung @ Heart. Choir Singing, Health and Age
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Steklacs, Janos (Ed.) International HEART 2016 Conference Health – Economy – Art (2016, March 11)

Young @ Heart. Choir Singing and Health The culture of amateur choral music has a long tradition in most countries of Europe. Choral societies grew up in the middle of the 19th century, and members were ... [more ▼]

Young @ Heart. Choir Singing and Health The culture of amateur choral music has a long tradition in most countries of Europe. Choral societies grew up in the middle of the 19th century, and members were young enthusiasts. Following the end of WW II glee clubs seemed to experience its renaissance that lasted until the seventieth. The decline of choir singing began, at least in my country – Luxembourg, about two decades ago, and today choir singing has become a pastime for elder people. In the past, the social aspect of corporate music-making in the area of amateur activities was an important argument of people coming together. Today, the claim for shared cultural activities is replaced by social media and networks, which gain in acceptance already among the older generation. Singing has become a matter of elderly persons. Health issues become more important: Common singing furthers concentration, overcomes isolation, is a continuous support for manifold forms of therapies. My lecture will give an insight into a leisure activity that combines hard work and musical performance based on decades of experience and will also present a famous example: the “Young@Heart-Chorus”. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung adults at risk in Germany: The impact of vocational training on the ethnic gap at labour market entry
Hartung, Anne UL

in Salagean, I.; Lomos, C.; Hartung, Anne (Eds.) The young and the elderly at risk Individual outcomes and contemporary policy challenges in European societies (2015)

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See detailThe Young and the Elderly at Risk: Individual outcomes and contemporary policy challenges in European societies
Salagean, I.; Lomos, C.; Hartung, Anne UL

Book published by Intersentia (2015)

The current retrenchment of the welfare states is buffering the growing demographic and economic pressures in European countries at the expense of the young and the elderly. However, both investment in ... [more ▼]

The current retrenchment of the welfare states is buffering the growing demographic and economic pressures in European countries at the expense of the young and the elderly. However, both investment in the young, which determines a society’s future, and providing public support for the elderly, the most deserving needy group, are seen as musts. This book encompasses a selection of empirical studies reflecting on when and why the young and the elderly are at risk in several (mostly Western) European countries. Contributions in the book examine the educational achievement and the labor market entry of youths, particularly those who have a migration background, the poverty risk experienced by the elderly, especially if they are also immigrants and/or women, the pension outcomes of former cross-border workers, the simulated consequeces of a recent pension benefit reform as well as those of a potential reform including financial assets and housing wealth in old-age income protection, and finally the extent, and possible erosion, of the support for government providing child-care and protecting the elderly. Preface – Wim van Oorschot Introduction – Ioana Salagean, Catalina Lomos & Anne Hartung 1. Does ethnic capital contribute to the educational outcomes of individuals with Turkish background in Europe? – Sait Bayrakdar 2. Young adults at risk in Germany: The impact of vocational training on the ethnic gap at labour market entry – Anne Hartung 3. Poverty among elderly immigrants in Belgium – Line De Witte, Sofie Vanassche & Hans Peeters 4. Integrating life course and pension policy perspectives: The case of poverty among elderly women – Hans Peeters & Wouter de Tavernier 5. Including assets in comparative old age poverty research: How does it change the picture? – Rika Verpoorten 6. The social and budgetary impacts of the recent social security reform in Belgium – Gijs Dekkers, Saskia Weemaes, Nicole Fasquelle & Raphael Desmet 7. Cross-border social security coordination, mobility of labour and pension outcomes – Irina Burlacu & Cathal O'Donoghue 8. Do self-interest, ideology and national context influence opinions on government support for childcare? A multilevel analysis – Wouter de Tavernier 9. Individual attitudes towards welfare states responsibility for the elderly – Nathalie Schuerman Rejoinder: Is intergenerational solidarity under pressure? Comparative analyses of age cleavages in opinions about government support for the young and the old – Tim Reeskens & Wim van Oorschot [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children capitalising on their entire language repertoire for language learning at school
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Language, Culture and Curriculum (2017)

While translanguaging has been well researched in bilingual settings with older pupils and has been found to contribute to cognitive and personal development, there is little research on translanguaging ... [more ▼]

While translanguaging has been well researched in bilingual settings with older pupils and has been found to contribute to cognitive and personal development, there is little research on translanguaging of young multilinguals. In trilingual Luxembourg, at school, children learn Luxembourgish aged 4, German aged 6 and French aged 7, with the majority not speaking Luxembourgish on school entry. The number of languages to be learned may leave teachers little space to capitalise on home languages and encourage translanguaging. Drawing on qualitative methods, this paper contextualises and examines the practice and purposes of translanguaging of nursery and primary school children who speak a language other than Luxembourgish at home, while they collaboratively produce oral texts on the iPad app iTEO. The data stem from a longitudinal study using a multi-method approach. The findings indicate that the children made use of their multilingual repertoire in order to communicate, construct knowledge and mark their multilingual identity. Translanguaging was a frequent and legitimate practice in both classes although the older children drew less on home languages other than Luxembourgish. The children’s ability to translanguage and their opportunities for doing so were influenced by the multilingual learning environment, the curriculum and the language learning tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children learning new languages out of school.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2006), 3(4), 258-279

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six eight-year-old Luxembourgish children use and learn German, French and English in formal and informal settings over a period of one year. Their eagerness to learn and use German and English contrasted with their cautious and formal approach to the learning of French. My findings demonstrate that second language learning in a multilingual country is not an ‘automatic’ or ‘natural’ process but, rather, children’s language behaviour depends on their personal goals, interests, competence, confidence and understanding of what counts as appropriate language use. These factors are influenced by the formal approach to language learning at school. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung Children’s Ethnifying Practices: An Ethnographic Research in a Daycare Center in Berlin
Seele, Claudia UL

Scientific Conference (2011, August 21)

I will present findings of an ethnographic research that was conducted in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the dominant ... [more ▼]

I will present findings of an ethnographic research that was conducted in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the dominant discourse most of them would be represented as ‘migrant children’ or ‘children with migrant background’. They thus come to function as ‘the Other’ in the construction of a normative version of ‘German children’. Family origins, language and physical appearance act as important criteria in this ethnifying of children. Embedded within this discursive framework my research focus however is on the perspectives of the children themselves and how they participate in the social construction of ethnic identities. Participant observation and symbolic group interviews were employed to explore the children’s practical strategies in dealing with ethnified identity ascriptions in everyday peer interactions. In line with the ‘new’ sociological study of childhood (e.g. James & Prout 1990) I perceive of children as competent social actors who do not just passively receive and imitate adult conceptions of the social order but actively and skillfully join in the construction of the social world. The ethnographic data show that children as young as 4 are able to use ethnic ascriptions as a ‘social tool’ (Van Ausdale & Feagin 2001) in their peer interactions. The broad range of practical and situational processes of differentiation and evaluation, of inclusion and exclusion, can be interpreted along a continuum from reproducing to challenging dominant constructions of belonging and ‘the Other’. I argue that ethnicity is not a pre-given fact but practically accomplished and negotiated in children’s social interactions. Thus, the research contributes to our understanding of children’s agency and competence as well as of the relationality, provisionality and context-dependence of children’s identities. [less ▲]

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