References of "Barros Coimbra, Stephanie 1160003752"
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See detailWelcome or not? – Natives’ security feelings, attachment and attitudes toward acculturation of immigrants
Goedert, Christine UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL et al

in International Journal of Intercultural Relations (2019), 69

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural ... [more ▼]

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural relations and sets the base for acculturation of immigrants. Drawing on attachment and multiculturalism research, we supposed here that general and specific feelings of security might be related to more positive attitudes toward cultural diversity, whereas feelings of threat might be related to less openness. More precisely, the present study investigated how natives’ general attachment (secure or fearful) as well as their specific feelings of (cultural or economic) security might be related to their expectations about acculturation of immigrants in the multicultural context of Luxembourg. The sample included N = 134 Luxembourg nationals with an average age of M = 45.02 (SD = 17.41) who filled out an online questionnaire. Results revealed that self-reported fearful general attachment was positively related to more unwelcoming acculturation orientations. Relations between general attachment and acculturation orientations were mediated by feelings of cultural security, which had strong effects on host nationals’ (un)welcoming acculturation orientations over and above general attachment. Findings suggest that (un)welcoming orientations toward immigrants, entailing openness for cultural contact and exchange, are related to feelings of cultural and economic security which are partly biased by a general secure or fearful attachment. Feelings of security seem thus to provide a secure base for tolerance and openness to cultural diversity which are needed in order to deal successfully with the challenges of today’s multicultural societies. [less ▲]

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See detailMigrating Identities: Affective Dialogues Across Generations
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Lehmann, Olga V.; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Deep Experiencing - Dialogues within the self (2018)

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” ... [more ▼]

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” and his experiences, thoughts, practices as well as his narrations. Yet, the character and degree of these interdependencies vary and fluctuate depending on the individuals, contexts and cultures. While the external dialogue occurs between people implicated in an overt interaction, the self happens in an individual’s mind as an internal dialogue. Individuals make sense of their lives through the narratives of crucial experiences in their lives, which makes the external dialogue discernible and easier to analyse compared to the internal dialogue not that easily tangible. Though, through an intergenerational interview between an adult daughter and her mother, we will try to assess and identify their individual internal dialogues within their narratives. Hence, to that end body language and behavioural indicators such as face expressions or silent thinking will be used, which may help and serve as guidelines to assess the intergenerational dialogical interaction between mother and adult child in a migrant context. [less ▲]

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See detailBecause I need them, because I don’t: Regulation of family relations between adult children and their parents
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Poster (2017, August)

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only ... [more ▼]

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only few studies have, however, focused on the regulation of relations between adult children and their ageing parents in host national compared to immigrant families. Migrant families might be confronted with specific tasks. While the acculturation situation might give rise to an increased need for intergenerational support, an acculturation gap between both generations can potentially lead to different expectations. Adult children from immigrant families might, for instance, be subject to the experience of ambivalent or conflictual feelings regarding the desire to become independent from their parents; at the same time, they may feel the urge to conform to parental expectations or to support their parents in accordance to the values of their parents’ culture of origin. However, older parents may also undergo changes in their perception of intergenerational support and lower their expectations in the process of acculturation. A qualitative cross-cultural comparison is conducted of n = 10 Portuguese and n = 10 Luxembourgish dyadic interviews of older parents and their adult children, both living in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. We will focus on different key issues regarding the regulation of intergenerational family relations between first and second generations of host nationals and immigrants focussing on processes such as interdependent and independent selfconstrual comparing both cultural groups and both generations. First analyses show a heightened importance of geographical proximity in Portuguese migrant families compared to Luxembourgish native families for family relations. Likewise, regular interactions appear to be more required, needed and expected in Portuguese migrant families, especially from the parents while this is only to some extent, supported by their children. [less ▲]

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See detail“I feel more Luxembourgish, but Portuguese too…” - “What country does have just one culture anyway?” Cultural identities in a Luxembourgish multicultural society
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July)

Migration is a key topic of the contemporary world, so is the concept of cultural identity that has gained more importance with the growing culturally diverse societies. Here, children of migrants usually ... [more ▼]

Migration is a key topic of the contemporary world, so is the concept of cultural identity that has gained more importance with the growing culturally diverse societies. Here, children of migrants usually find themselves in a particular situation as they are confronted to different value systems and cultures. How do these so-called second generation children experience and construct their identities growing up in a diverse cultural context? In the present study, we will have a closer look at aspects of acculturation of Portuguese migrant families living in Luxembourg by use of a standardized questionnaire (n = 55 PT migrant triads) and qualitative interviews (n = 10 migrant family dyads). We will focus on the dealing with multiple cultural identities, cultural attachment to host and home country. We will therefore compare first and second generations from PT migrant families to assess differences or similarities in their identity constructions in the Luxembourgish multicultural arena. [less ▲]

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See detailLes immigrants portugais au Luxembourg : Projets futurs et bien-être
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, March 01)

Actuellement, dans plusieurs pays européens, les immigrants de la première génération se rapprochent de l’âge de la retraite, confrontant ainsi prochainement les sociétés occidentales aux besoins ... [more ▼]

Actuellement, dans plusieurs pays européens, les immigrants de la première génération se rapprochent de l’âge de la retraite, confrontant ainsi prochainement les sociétés occidentales aux besoins émergents des futurs pensionnés immigrants et de leur famille. Au Luxembourg, à ce jour, la communauté portugaise représente le groupe migrant le plus important (16 % de la population totale). En 2011, près de 14% de la population totale était recensé comme étant âgé de plus de 65 ans, dont 3.7% de Portugais. Peu de recherches ont été menées concernant les projets futurs de ces immigrants portugais ainsi que des attentes mutuelles entre générations familiales. Dans notre étude nous nous concentrons sur (1) les projets futurs du retour migratoire des immigrants portugais âgés, (2) les caractéristiques des différents groupes (a)rester au Luxembourg, b) retourner au Portugal, c) alterner entre les deux pays) et (3) les stratégies d’autorégulation de chaque groupe en considérant le contrôle primaire et secondaire, la satisfaction de vie ainsi que le soutien intergénérationnel entre parents migrants âgés et leurs enfants adultes. L’étude présentée fait partie du projet IRMA (« Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing »), qui s’intéresse aux relations entre les enfants adultes et leurs parents âgés, en comparant des familles PT à des familles LU, toutes résidentes du Luxembourg. Seules les données concernant la génération des parents PT ont été utilisées pour la présente étude. Les participants, au nombre de N = 125 et âgés entre 41 et 80 ans (51.2% de femmes), ont été interrogés à l’aide d’un questionnaire standardisé (PT et FR). Tous les participants sont nés au Portugal, mais vivent au Luxembourg depuis en moyenne M = 31.36 ans (SD = 8.66). Les résultats démontrent la diversité au sein du groupe des immigrants. Les raisons d’un éventuel retour s’avèrent être de nature plutôt personnelle/individuelle, liées aux aspects du style de vie ainsi qu’à un sentiment d’identité culturelle étroitement associé au pays d’origine ; les motifs pour rester au Luxembourg ou alterner sont quant à eux plutôt sociaux/familiaux et pratiques. La venue de petits-enfants ainsi que le lieu de vie des enfants adultes semblent influencer la décision finale, laissant entrevoir l’importance des relations et du soutien intergénérationnels. La participation et le dévouement au pays d’accueil et le choix de rester peuvent aussi grandir au fur et à mesure des années passées dans ce pays. Les programmes pour la prévention de la santé et la promotion du bien-être devraient être plus étroitement adaptés aux besoins, souhaits et idéaux des immigrants âgés, tout en prenant en considération la question de savoir où ils veulent habiter dans le futur et pourquoi ainsi que le système de soutien intrafamiliale mis en place par les familles elles-mêmes. Les résultats seront davantage discutés et élaborés en vue d’éventuels futurs programmes de prévention et de soutien. [less ▲]

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See detailAcculturation strategies of young immigrants living in Belgium: The view of young Belgian nationals
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

in Roland-Lévi, Christine; Denoux, Patrick; Voyer, Benjamin (Eds.) et al Unity, diversity and culture. Proceedings from the 22nd Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (2016)

In contemporary society, migration has become a key topic. According to Berry (1997), individuals might display different attitudes and behaviors in the process of acculturation, defined as cultural and ... [more ▼]

In contemporary society, migration has become a key topic. According to Berry (1997), individuals might display different attitudes and behaviors in the process of acculturation, defined as cultural and psychological changes resulting from the direct contact among members of multiple cultures. Whereas most research has concentrated on the acculturation strategies of immigrants, the aim of this study is to focus on the preferences of members of the receiving society. In particular, we analyze which strategy young Belgians consider the most suitable for immigrants to adopt, using a sample of Belgian students between the ages of 18 and 29 years living in Brussels. We account for several variables to shed light on the important aspects of intergroup relationships between host nationals and immigrants. [less ▲]

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