References of "Barazzetta, Marta 50003694"
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See detailFamily income and material deprivation: do they matter for sleep quality and quantity in early life? Evidence from a longitudinal study.
Barazzetta, Marta UL; Ghislandi, Simone

in Sleep (in press)

Study Objectives: The aim of the present paper is to investigate the determinants of sleeping patterns in children up to age 9 on a large and geographically homogeneous sample of British children and ... [more ▼]

Study Objectives: The aim of the present paper is to investigate the determinants of sleeping patterns in children up to age 9 on a large and geographically homogeneous sample of British children and parents, focusing in particular on the role of economic and social factors, specifically on income. Methods: The data of this study come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a long-term health research project that recruited over 14,000 pregnant women who were due to give birth between April 1991 and December 1992 in Bristol and its surrounding areas, including some of Somerset and Gloucestershire. Logistic regression models for the sleep problems dummies and log-linear models for the sleep quantity. Results: One additional item in the material deprivation index is associated to an increase of around 10% to 20% in the odds of having at least one sleep problem. Similarly, children from the richest families are less likely to have any sleep problem up to 115 months (around 20% reduction in the odds). Mother’s characteristics (i.e. education and mental health in the pregnancy period) are also significant predictors. Sleep quantity does not vary much and is not sensitive to socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: Exposure to income-related inequalities affects child sleep. Further research is needed in order to understand if sleep in early life influence future health and economic trajectories. [less ▲]

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See detailUnfairness at Work: Well-Being and Quits
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Clark, Andrew; Barazzetta, Marta UL

in Labour Economics (2018), 51

We here consider the effect of the level of income that individuals consider to be fair for the job they do, which we take as measure of comparison income, on both subjective well-being and objective ... [more ▼]

We here consider the effect of the level of income that individuals consider to be fair for the job they do, which we take as measure of comparison income, on both subjective well-being and objective future job quitting. In six waves of German Socio-Economic Panel data, the extent to which own labour income is perceived to be unfair is significantly negatively correlated with subjective well-being, both in terms of cognitive evaluations (life and job satisfaction) and affect (the frequency of feeling happy, sad and angry). Perceived unfairness also translates into objective labour-market behaviour, with current unfair income predicting future job quits. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowing up during a financial crisis: The effect of family financial distress on child development
Barazzetta, Marta UL; Clark, Andrew E.; D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL

in SOLIDAR (Ed.) Progressive Structural Reforms. Proposals for European reforms to reduce inequalities and promote jobs, growth and social investment (2015)

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See detailHedonic adaptation to a treatment. Evidence from a medical intervention
Barazzetta, Marta UL; Appleton, Simon; Owens, Trudy

E-print/Working paper (2015)

We investigate adaptation of subjective well-being using a randomized controlled trial. We find that providing medical equipment to a random sample of Ugandan adults with lower limb disabilities has a ... [more ▼]

We investigate adaptation of subjective well-being using a randomized controlled trial. We find that providing medical equipment to a random sample of Ugandan adults with lower limb disabilities has a positive effect on their physical health, using both objective and self-reported measures. Treated patients experience a significant improvement in life satisfaction initially, but the effect is not prolonged. After one year, life satisfaction returns to the pre-treatment level, supporting the hypothesis of adaptation. This evidence of adaptation is supported by observations of changes in aspirations and expectations and is robust to alternative estimation methods including instrumental variable estimation and ITT analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe asymmetric effect of expectations on subjective well-being
Barazzetta, Marta UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

We empirically explore the relationship between expectations and subjective well-being. The- oretical models predict that expectations can in uence experienced utility in two ways: (i) directly as ... [more ▼]

We empirically explore the relationship between expectations and subjective well-being. The- oretical models predict that expectations can in uence experienced utility in two ways: (i) directly as anticipatory emotions in the form of savouring or dread; (ii) indirectly as internal reference levels in the form of deviations between expectations and actual achievements. We use twelve waves of the British Household Panel Survey to empirically investigate the double effect of expectations on experienced utility, as proxied by subjective well-being. We find a strong asymmetry in the way expectations affect subjective well-being. Negative deviations from expectations have a strong negative effect on subjective well-being, while the effect of positive deviations is weaker and sometimes insignificant. Expecting a worsening has a larger impact on subjective well-being than expecting an improvement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (9 UL)