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See detailDepression Burden in Luxembourg: Individual Risk Factors, Geographic Variations and the Role of Migration, 2013-2015 European Health Examination Survey
Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Perquin, Magali et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2017), 222

Background: Depression is a complex mental disorder that affects an increasing proportion of the worldwide population. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

Background: Depression is a complex mental disorder that affects an increasing proportion of the worldwide population. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Luxembourg, associated risk factors and geographic variations. Additionally, it aims to assess whether first and second generation immigrants are at higher risk for depressive symptoms compared to non-immigrants. Methods: Representative cross-sectional data from 1499 residents of Luxembourg, aged 25 to 64 years, were collected from the Luxembourg European Health Survey (EHES-LUX). Depressive symptoms were defined as a score of ≥5 on the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression (PHQ-9) (i.e. mild, moderate or severe). Standard and Bayesian regression models were used to examine associations between depressive symptoms, immigration status and geographic distribution across Luxembourg. Results: The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 21.55% (15.54% mild, 3.54% moderate, and 2.49% moderately severe to severe). The odds of having depressive symptoms was higher among second generation immigrants compared to non-immigrants (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.41), independent of socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics. Healthier diet, higher social support and good health perception were protective towards experiencing depressive symptoms. One of the highest likelihoods of reporting depressive symptoms was observed in the South-West of the country with a positive effect at 80% credible region [CR] (1.42 [0.92, 2.73]). Limitations: The participation rate was low (26.7%). The cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow us to establish causality. Conclusions: Depression constitutes an important public health challenge in Luxembourg due to the impact on the overall health of the population. Social programs of health promotion should be developed to improve mental wellbeing in immigrants, especially those of second generation. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital health in ambulatory assessment
Vögele, Claus UL

Book published by INSIDE (2017)

In this volume all accepted contributions to the 5th Biennial Conference of the Society for Ambulatory Assessment are published. The number and quality of these contributions testify to the high standard ... [more ▼]

In this volume all accepted contributions to the 5th Biennial Conference of the Society for Ambulatory Assessment are published. The number and quality of these contributions testify to the high standard of international research in ambulatory monitoring, the rapid advances in technology and data handling supporting ambulatory assessment, and the importance of these developments for the rapidly expanding area of Digital Health. Converging technologies such as Internet applications, social networks, smartphones and wearable sensors in the area of health, are now beginning to transform our approach to health research, healthcare, and communication and access to information. [less ▲]

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See detailMood, emotions and eating disorders
Vögele, Claus UL; Lutz, Annika UL; Gibson, E. Leigh

in Agras, W. Stewart; Hagler Robinson, Athena (Eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Eating Disorders, Second Edition (2017)

Mood and emotions are intrinsically involved with eating. This chapter discusses basic mechanisms, findings, and models that help our understanding of the interactions between eating and emotions, in both ... [more ▼]

Mood and emotions are intrinsically involved with eating. This chapter discusses basic mechanisms, findings, and models that help our understanding of the interactions between eating and emotions, in both clinical and nonclinical populations. The finding that negative affect predicts EDs transdiagnostically, and that comorbidity with depressive disorders and anxiety disorders is the norm among patients with EDs suggests that EDs may not necessarily be restricted to domains of eating behavior and body image but may also be associated with significant difficulties in affective functioning. This chapter reviews the evidence relating to the notion that EDs are disturbances of mood regulation, in which regulatory strategies specifically related to eating and the body are used to diminish negative affect associated with food, body image, or stress. [less ▲]

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See detailPlace, green exercise and stress: an exploration of lived experience and restorative effects
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora; Cloke, Paul; Vögele, Claus UL

in Health & Place (2017)

This paper reports on inter-disciplinary research designed to investigate the stress-buffering effects of green exercise, and the importance of the context in which exercise takes place. This ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on inter-disciplinary research designed to investigate the stress-buffering effects of green exercise, and the importance of the context in which exercise takes place. This investigation of context effects examines both individual physiological responses (salivary cortisol) and the phenomenological interpretation of lived experiences of the intervention, reported by a subsample of participants in a randomized, controlled trial, in which healthy, physically inactive university students were randomly allocated to three activities: walking on a treadmill in a gym, walking in semi-natural recreational area, and sitting and watching nature-based videos on TV. The study found clear indications of context effects, notably in the connections between positive appraisals of perceived circumstances, enjoyment in the enacted context, and physiological stress-reduction. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneralized hypervigilance in fibromyalgia: normal interoceptive accuracy, but reduced self-regulatory capacity
Rost, Silke UL; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Schulz, André UL et al

in Journal of Psychosomatic Research (2017), 93(2), 48-54

Objective: The factors underlying the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM) are largely unknown. According to the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH), FM patients show excessive attention towards pain ... [more ▼]

Objective: The factors underlying the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM) are largely unknown. According to the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH), FM patients show excessive attention towards pain stimuli and other sensory events, thereby increasing pain perception and dysfunctional behaviour. We tested this notion by assessing interoceptive accuracy (IA) in FM patients and matched healthy controls. We also tested the hypothesis that FM is characterized by reduced self-regulatory capacity as indexed by heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: 47 FM patients (Mage = 45.5, 39 females) and 45 healthy controls (Mage = 44.9, 37 females) completed several self-report scales (Body Vigilance Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, Pain Catastrophizing Scale). To derive HRV, heart rate was monitored under resting conditions; for the assessment of IA participants performed a heartbeat tracking task in which they were asked to silently count their heartbeats. Results: FM patients reported higher body vigilance than healthy controls, but there were no group differences in IA. FM patients had lower HRV compared with healthy controls. HRV did not predictor IA. Conclusion: In conclusion, our findings do not support the hypothesis of generalized hypervigilance in FM patients. Patients reported a heightened focus on bodily sensations, which was not reflected in IA. It may be that hypervigilance is not a general and stable characteristic but is rather context dependent and modality-specific. [less ▲]

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See detailGastric modulation of startle eye blink
Schulz, André UL; Van Dyck; Lutz, Annika UL et al

in Biological Psychology (2017), 127(1), 25-33

Abstract: Previous assessment methods of gastric interoception either rely on self-reports, or imply invasive procedures. We investigated the reliability of startle methodology as a non-invasive ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Previous assessment methods of gastric interoception either rely on self-reports, or imply invasive procedures. We investigated the reliability of startle methodology as a non-invasive alternative for the assessment of afferent gastric signals. Twenty-four participants were tested on three separate days, on which they were requested to ingest water (either 0, 300 or 600 ml), after 8 h of fasting. On each assessment day, eye blink responses (EMG) to 10 acoustic startle stimuli (105 dB) were assessed at 4 measurement points (before, 0, 7, 14 min. after ingestion). Increased normogastric responses (EGG), ratings of satiety and fullness, and higher heart rate variability (RMSSD) suggested effective non-invasive induction of gastric distention. Startle responses were lower directly after ingestion of 600 ml as compared to earlier and later measurements. These results suggest that startle methodology provides a reliable method to investigate afferent gastric signals. It could be useful to study possible dissociations between subjective reports and objective afferent gastric signals in eating or somatoform disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep and somatic complaints in university students
Schlarb, Angelika; Claßen, Merle; Hellmann, Sara et al

in Journal of Pain Research (2017), 10

Background: Sleep problems are common among university students. Poor sleep is associated with impaired daily functioning, increased risk of psychiatric symptoms, and somatic complaints such as pain ... [more ▼]

Background: Sleep problems are common among university students. Poor sleep is associated with impaired daily functioning, increased risk of psychiatric symptoms, and somatic complaints such as pain. Previous results suggest that poor sleep exacerbates pain, which in turn negatively affects sleep. The purpose of the present study was to determine prevalence rates, comorbidity, and role of depression as a factor of moderating the relationship between sleep and physical complaints in German university students. Samples and methods: In total, 2443 German university students (65% women) completed a web survey. Self-report measures included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, three modules of the Patient Health Questionnaire, and a questionnaire on the functional somatic syndromes (FSSs). Results: More than one-third (36.9%) reported poor sleep as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Somatoform syndrome was identified in 23.5%, and the prevalence of any FSS was 12.8%. Self-reported sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep disturbances, use of sleep medications, and daytime dysfunctioning were significant predictors of somatoform syndrome, whereas sleep efficiency and sleep duration influenced somatic complaints indirectly. Moderate correlations were found between stress, anxiety, somatoform syndrome, depression, and overall sleep quality. The effect of somatic complaints on sleep quality was associated with the severity of depression. Anxiety shows direct effects on somatization and depression but only indirect associations with sleep quality. [less ▲]

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See detailGrand challenges in eating behavior research: preventing weight gain, facilitating long-term weight maintenance
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2017), 8

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See detailSleep disturbances and mental strain in university students: results from an online survey in Luxembourg and Germany
Schlarb, Angelika; Claßen, Merle; Grünewald, Julia et al

in International Journal of Mental Health Systems (2017), 11

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the prevalence of sleep disturbances and mental strain in students from two European countries, Luxembourg and Germany. METHODS: A total of 2831 students took part in an ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the prevalence of sleep disturbances and mental strain in students from two European countries, Luxembourg and Germany. METHODS: A total of 2831 students took part in an online survey, with 2777 students from Germany and 184 students from Luxembourg. Sleep disturbances were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and aspects of mental strain using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Social-Interactive-Anxiety Scale, the self-efficacy questionnaire and the test anxiety questionnaire. In addition, we also assessed students' chronotypes. RESULTS: Across the whole sample mean scores on the sleep questionnaires were above the cut-off for clinically relevant sleep problems, indicating an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in students from both countries. Sleep quality was impaired in 42.8%, and 17.9% showed clinically relevant scores. Overall 25.5% reported elevated depression and 13.3% social phobia symptoms, while 45% indicated elevated stress levels. Sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, chronotype, depression scores, stress levels, test anxiety, and self-efficacy differed significantly between men and women, but there were no differences between countries. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep disturbances and mental strain in students are common, with the current results replicating previous findings. Students from Luxembourg and Germany are affected equally. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen exercise is associated with better cell ageing profiles
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora; Cloke, Paul; Epel, Elissa et al

in The European Journal of Public Health (2016, November 01), 26(Suppl 1), 165021

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See detailResilience and rejection sensitivity mediate long-term outcomes of parental divorce
Schaan, Violetta UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2016), 25(11), 1267-1269

Introduction: Increasing divorce rates leave more and more children to deal with the separation of their parents. Recent research suggests that children of divorced parents more often experience ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Increasing divorce rates leave more and more children to deal with the separation of their parents. Recent research suggests that children of divorced parents more often experience psychological and physical symptoms than children of non-divorced parents. The processes that mediate the relationship between parental divorce and ill-health, however, are still elusive. The current study investigated the mediating role of psychological factors such as resilience and rejection sensitivity on the long-term consequences of parental divorce in young adults. Methods: One hundred and ninety-nine participants (mean age 22.3 years) completed an online survey including measures of mental health, childhood trauma, resilience and rejection sensitivity. Results: Participants with divorced parents (33%) reported increased levels of psychological symptoms, childhood trauma, rejection sensitivity and lower levels of resilience. The association between parental divorce and mental health was fully mediated by resilience, rejection sensitivity and childhood trauma. The mediation model explained up to 44% of the total variance in mental health symptoms. Discussion: Resilience and rejection sensitivity are crucial factors for successful coping with the experience of parental separation. Prevention programs that help to boost children’s resilience might help to reduce the long-term effects of parental divorce on their attachment style (e.g. rejection sensitivity), thereby improving their mental health on the long run. Furthermore, the results call for parental awareness and counseling to target and reduce the observed increased level of childhood trauma. Limitations concern the cross-sectional and retrospective design of the study. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Water Load Test As a Measure of Gastric Interoception: Development of a Two-Stage Protocol and Application to a Healthy Female Population
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL; Blechert, Jens et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11(9), 0163574

The sensitivity for one’s own internal body signals (i.e., interoception) has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating and weight disorders. Most previous measures ... [more ▼]

The sensitivity for one’s own internal body signals (i.e., interoception) has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating and weight disorders. Most previous measures assessing interoceptive processing have not, or only partly, captured perception of hunger and satiety cues, which is a core aspect of interoceptive deficits in eating disorders. In addition, methods used to measure sensitivity to gastric signals are heterogeneous and findings inconsistent. The primary aim of the present study was to establish a standardised test to measure gastric interoception, and to provide normative data using a non-clinical adult sample. The two-step Water Load Test (WLT-II) involves ingestion of non-caloric water until perceived satiation (step 1) and until maximum fullness (step 2). The WLT-II consists of several variables: Besides volumes of water ingested until satiation and maximum fullness expressed in ml, percentage of satiation to maximum fullness is calculated as an individual index of gastric interoception that is not confounded with stomach capacity. Ninety-nine healthy women participated in the study. Measures included the WLT-II, the heartbeat tracking test, a self-report questionnaire assessing subjective sensations, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Twenty-eight participants underwent test-retest of the WLT-II. Results suggest that the WLT-II is a valid and reliable measure of gastric interoception. Importantly, satiation volume and percentage of satiation to maximum fullness were strongly positively related to self-reported bulimic symptoms, indicating that the WLT-II could emerge as a useful clinical tool to measure interoceptive processing in the field of eating disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiac modulation of startle is altered in depersonalization-/derealization disorder: evidence for impaired brainstem representation of baro-afferent neural traffic
Schulz, André UL; Matthey, J. H.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Psychiatry Research (2016), 240(1), 4-10

Patients with depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) show altered heartbeat-evoked brain potentials, which are considered psychophysiological indicators of cortical representation of visceral ... [more ▼]

Patients with depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) show altered heartbeat-evoked brain potentials, which are considered psychophysiological indicators of cortical representation of visceral-afferent neural signals. The aim of the current investigation was to clarify whether the impaired CNS representation of visceral-afferent neural signals in DPD is restricted to the cortical level or is also present in sub-cortical structures. We used cardiac modulation of startle (CMS) to assess baro-afferent signal transmission at brainstem level in 22 DPD and 23 healthy control individuals. The CMS paradigm involved acoustic startle stimuli (105 dB(A), 50 ms) elicited 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ms after a cardiac R-wave. In healthy control individuals, we observed lower startle responses at 100 and 300 ms than at 0 and 400 ms after an R-wave. In DPD patients, no effect of the cardiac cycle on startle response magnitude was found. We conclude that the representation of visceral-afferent neural signals at brainstem level may be deficient in DPD. This effect may be due to increased peripheral sympathetic tone or to dysregulated signal processing at brainstem level. [less ▲]

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See detailEarly life adversity associates with increased depressive symptoms and few active T cells in adulthood
Elwenspoek, Martha; Schaan, Violetta UL; Hengesch, Xenia et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailA meta-analysis on resting state high-frequency heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa
Peschel, Stephanie K.V.; Feeling, Nicole R.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in European Eating Disorders Review (2016), 24(5), 355-365

Objective: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability (HF ... [more ▼]

Objective: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) comparing patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and healthy controls. Methods: A systematic search of the literature to identify studies eligible for inclusion and meta-analytical methods were applied. Meta-regression was used to identify potential covariates. Results: 8 studies reporting measures of resting HF-HRV in individuals with BN (n=137) and controls (n=190) were included. Random-effects meta-analysis revealed a sizeable main effect (Z=2.22, p=.03; Hedge’s g=0.52, 95%CI[0.06;0.98]) indicating higher resting state vagal activity in individuals with BN. Meta-regression showed that BMI and medication intake are significant covariates. Discussion: Findings suggest higher vagal activity in BN at rest, particularly in un-medicated samples with lower body mass index. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings and implications for routine clinical care are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychological preparation and postoperative outcomes for adults undergoing surgery under general anaesthesia
Powell, Rachael; Scott, Neal; Manyande, Anne et al

in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online) (2016), (5), 1-279

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative ... [more ▼]

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Since this review, more detailed bibliographic searching has become possible, additional studies testing psychological preparation for surgery have been completed and hospital procedures have changed. The present review examines whether psychological preparation (procedural information, sensory information, cognitive intervention, relaxation, hypnosis and emotion-focused intervention) has impact on the outcomes of postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials of adult participants (aged 16 or older) undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia. We excluded studies focusing on patient groups with clinically diagnosed psychological morbidity. We did not limit the search by language or publication status. We included studies testing a preoperative psychological intervention that included at least one of these seven techniques: procedural information; sensory information; behavioural instruction; cognitive intervention; relaxation techniques; hypnosis; emotion-focused intervention. We included studies that examined any one of our postoperative outcome measures (pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay, negative affect) within one month post-surgery. Data collection and analysis One author checked titles and abstracts to exclude obviously irrelevant studies. We obtained full reports of apparently relevant studies; two authors fully screened these. Two authors independently extracted data and resolved discrepancies by discussion. Where possible we used random-effects meta-analyses to combine the results from individual studies. For length of stay we pooled mean differences. For pain and negative affect we used a standardized effect size (the standardized mean difference (SMD), or Hedges’ g) to combine data from different outcome measures. If data were not available in a form suitable for meta-analysis we performed a narrative review. Main results Searches identified 5116 unique papers; we retrieved 827 for full screening. In this review, we included 105 studies from 115 papers, in which 10,302 participants were randomized. Mainly as a result of updating the search in July 2015, 38 papers are awaiting classification. Sixty-one of the 105 studies measured the outcome pain, 14 behavioural recovery, 58 length of stay and 49 negative affect. Participants underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, and a range of psychological components were used in interventions, frequently in combination. In the 105 studies, appropriate datawere provided for themeta-analysis of 38 studiesmeasuring the outcome postoperative pain (2713 participants), 36 for length of stay (3313 participants) and 31 for negative affect (2496 participants). We narratively reviewed the remaining studies (including the 14 studies with 1441 participants addressing behavioural recovery). When pooling the results for all types of intervention there was low quality evidence that psychological preparation techniques were associated with lower postoperative pain (SMD -0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.35 to -0.06), length of stay (mean difference -0.52 days, 95% CI - 0.82 to -0.22) and negative affect (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.54 to -0.16) compared with controls. Results tended to be similar for all categories of intervention, although there was no evidence that behavioural instruction reduced the outcome pain. However, caution must be exercised when interpreting the results because of heterogeneity in the types of surgery, interventions and outcomes. Narratively reviewed evidence for the outcome behavioural recovery provided very low quality evidence that psychological preparation, in particular behavioural instruction, may have potential to improve behavioural recovery outcomes, but no clear conclusions could be reached. Generally, the evidence suffered from poor reporting, meaning that few studies could be classified as having low risk of bias. Overall,we rated the quality of evidence for each outcome as ‘low’ because of the high level of heterogeneity in meta-analysed studies and the unclear risk of bias. In addition, for the outcome behavioural recovery, too few studies used robust measures and reported suitable data for meta-analysis, so we rated the quality of evidence as ’very low’. Authors’ conclusions The evidence suggested that psychological preparation may be beneficial for the outcomes postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, negative affect and length of stay, and is unlikely to be harmful. However, at present, the strength of evidence is insufficient to reach firm conclusions on the role of psychological preparation for surgery. Further analyses are needed to explore the heterogeneity in the data, to identify more specifically when intervention techniques are of benefit. As the current evidence quality is low or very low, there is a need for well-conducted and clearly reported research. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscourses of sexual relationships in a sample of German and British young people: A Q methodological study
Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Culture, Health and Sexuality (2016), 18(4), 391-404

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development ... [more ▼]

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development, means that sexual double standards prevail in young people’s lives. The aim of this study was to explore the discourses young women and men from two European countries, Germany and England, draw on when making sense of sexual relationships, and how these are steeped in the local cultural climate and messages. The study used Q methodology and included 65 German and English young people between 16 and 19 years of age. Six accounts emerged: sex as responsible, intimate and shared experience; sex as joint fun; ideal versus reality; sex has to be responsible, consensual and shared; caring relationships offer the perfect context for fulfilling sex; and equality between partners. The importance of cultural context in the availability of specific dominant and alternative discourses is discussed with a focus on how this influences young people’s sense-making with regard to sexuality and sexual relationships. Future directions for research are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailVerhaltensmedizinische Modelle bei körperlicher Erkrankung
Vögele, Claus UL; Schulz, André UL

in Psychotherapie im Dialog (2016), 17(1), 30-33

Die Annahme, dass psychische Faktoren zur Entwicklung körperlicher Krankheiten beitragen könnten, hat eine lange Tradition in den Gesundheitswissenschaften. Verschiedene Teildisziplinen der Psychologie ... [more ▼]

Die Annahme, dass psychische Faktoren zur Entwicklung körperlicher Krankheiten beitragen könnten, hat eine lange Tradition in den Gesundheitswissenschaften. Verschiedene Teildisziplinen der Psychologie wie die Klinische Psychologie und die Gesundheitspsychologie sowie interdisziplinäre Fachgebiete wie die Verhaltensmedizin widmen sich der Untersuchung ätiologisch bedeutsamer oder aufrechterhaltender Faktoren des menschlichen Verhaltens und Erlebens. Mithilfe der gewonnenen Erkenntnisse über Ursache-Wirkungs-Zusammenhänge können Diagnose- und Behandlungsmethoden entwickelt werden. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of physical activity on emotion regulation in adolescents
Ouzzahra, Yacine UL; Vögele, Claus UL; Mata, Jutta

Scientific Conference (2016, February 27)

A growing body of evidence suggests an important contribution of physical activity to psychological well-being. While much of this research has focused on mood, less is known regarding emotion regulation ... [more ▼]

A growing body of evidence suggests an important contribution of physical activity to psychological well-being. While much of this research has focused on mood, less is known regarding emotion regulation. The present study investigated acute and chronic effects of exercise on responses to emotional stimuli in adolescents. Male and female students (N=40) aged 15-18 years participated in a two conditions, repeated-measures, fully counterbalanced design. In the first part of each session heart rate, electrodermal activity, respiration rate and heart rate variability were continuously recorded during a 10-min baseline. This was followed by a previously validated anger-provoking video-clip lasting 2-6 minutes. Participants rated the level of arousal and discrete emotions they experienced in response to the clip. The second part of the experiment consisted of a 30 minutes intervention period (rest or stationary cycling), immediately followed by another video-clip and questionnaire. The ongoing data analysis consists of (1) comparisons between conditions (acute effects) and (2) analyses of covariance regarding the physiological changes in response to the emotional stimuli, with participants’ fitness level used as a covariant (chronic effects). Preliminary results indicate that in the exercising condition, participants reported significantly lower levels of arousal, anxiety, anger, surprise and disgust, compared with the resting condition (p≤0.05). In contrast, fear, shame, sadness, and calmness did not differ between conditions. Further analyses will reveal whether participants’ physical fitness and heart rate variability had an impact on their physiological and psychological reactivity to the negative emotional stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailInterozeption bei Anorexia nervosa: Befunde auf subjektiver und elektrophysiologischer Ebene
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

in 15. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Verhaltensmedizin und Verhaltensmodifikation. Verhaltensmedizin 2.0 - von eHealth zu mHealth. 25. bis 27. Februar 2016, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Abstractband (2016, February)

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