References of "Samuel, Robin 50009791"
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See detailValuing Creativity, Feeling Overworked and Working Hours: Male Workers and the New Spirit of Capitalism
Samuel, Robin UL; Kanji, Shireen

in Time & Society (in press)

Boltanski and Chiapello (2005) argued that creativity is a required attribute of managers emanating from the ideology of the ‘New Spirit of Capitalism’. Ideology provides the justification for work ... [more ▼]

Boltanski and Chiapello (2005) argued that creativity is a required attribute of managers emanating from the ideology of the ‘New Spirit of Capitalism’. Ideology provides the justification for work practices and brings material consequences in relation to the experience of time. This article explores both the ideology and the links between the ideological and the experience of time by assessing whether male managers prioritise creativity and whether this is related to their working hours, driving them to work longer hours than other workers and longer hours than they actually want. Men’s dominant position in work organisations puts them at the centre of this exploration. Using multilevel logistic and linear models on 2010 data from the European Social Survey (N = 7049), we show that male managers prioritise creativity more than other workers do. There are consequences for the experience of time as valuing creativity in combination with being a manager increases working hours above the large and significant effect of being a manager. The feeling of overwork is raised independently for those who value creativity and for those who are managers. [less ▲]

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See detailArbeitslosigkeit für Lehrabgänger problematisch
Sacchi, Stefan; Shi, Lulu P.; Imdorf, Christian et al

in Die Volkswirtschaft (in press)

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See detailInforming a social practice theory framework with social-psychological factors for analyzing routinized energy consumption: A multivariate analysis of three practices
Hess, Ann-Kathrin; Samuel, Robin UL; Burger, Paul

in Energy Research & Social Science (2018), 46

A key factor contributing to the non-realization of energy efficiency potentials is the routinized way in which many energy consumption behaviors (ECBs) are performed. To analyze routinized ECBs, we draw ... [more ▼]

A key factor contributing to the non-realization of energy efficiency potentials is the routinized way in which many energy consumption behaviors (ECBs) are performed. To analyze routinized ECBs, we draw on social practice theory and psychological concepts and suggest a framework that considers individual, social, and material factors. Based on our proposed framework and employing multivariate regression analysis, we gain new insights into associated factors of routinized ECBs—particularly for washing and drying clothes and showering. Analyzing data from a survey conducted among Swiss households in 2016 (n=5015), we find that individual values, practice-specific wants, and materials explain variations in routinized ECB performance. Furthermore, socio-demographic predictors shed light on cultural and status differences associated with routinized ECBs. This paper contributes to understanding associated factors of routinized ECBs by bridging practice theory and psychology-based factors. [less ▲]

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See detailHow unemployment scarring affects skilled young workers: evidence from a factorial survey of Swiss recruiters
Shi, Lulu P.; Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in Journal for Labour Market Research = Zeitschrift für Arbeitsmarktforschung (2018), 52(7),

We ask how employers contribute to unemployment scarring in the recruitment process in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. By drawing on recruitment theories, we aim to better understand how ... [more ▼]

We ask how employers contribute to unemployment scarring in the recruitment process in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. By drawing on recruitment theories, we aim to better understand how recruiters assess different patterns of unemployment in a job candidate’s CV and how this affects the chances of young applicants being considered for a vacancy. We argue that in contexts with tight school-work linkage and highly standardised Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems, the detrimental effect of early unemployment depends on how well the applicant’s profile matches the requirements of the advertised position. To test this assumption, we surveyed Swiss recruiters who were seeking to fill positions during the time of data collection. We employed a factorial survey experiment that tested how the (un)employment trajectories in hypothetical young job applicants’ CVs affected their chances of being considered for a real vacancy. Our results show that unemployment decreases the perceived suitability of an applicant for a specific job, which implies there is a scarring effect of unemployment that increases with the duration of being unemployed. But we also found that these effects are moderated by how well the applicant’s profile matches the job’s requirements. Overall, the worse the match between applicant’s profile and the job profile, the smaller are the scarring effects of unemployment. In sum, our findings contribute to the literature by revealing considerable heterogeneity in the scarring effects of unemployment. Our findings further suggest that the scarring effects of unemployment need to be studied with regard to country-specific institutional settings, the applicants’ previous education and employment experiences, and the job characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Introduction to Factorial Designs Using the Example of Hiring Decisions
Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2018, April 24)

In this contribution, we use a factorial design to explore the moderating role of transaction costs on scarring due to previous unemployment and skills underutilization. Furthermore, we investigate the ... [more ▼]

In this contribution, we use a factorial design to explore the moderating role of transaction costs on scarring due to previous unemployment and skills underutilization. Furthermore, we investigate the extent to which the perceived difficulty of recruiting moderates these effects. Factorial designs allow studying respondents’ evaluations as a function of multidimensional stimuli. In this application, we create a pool of hypothetical candidates, where we experimentally vary individual characteristics of young job applicants. We then measure how our respondents, actual recruiters, evaluate the hiring chances of these young people. We further use information provided by the respondents to estimate transaction costs. Using data from a recent large-scale factorial survey of recruiters in four European countries and employing multilevel linear regression models, we found, overall, scarring due to skills underutilization to exceed scarring due to unemployment. Skills underutilization was especially penalized when recruiting for a particular position was considered easy. Indirect transaction costs, particularly anticipated time required for organizational socialization, were negatively associated with unemployment scarring, but positively with scarring due to skill underutilization. Unemployment spells only had a negative effect on hiring chances, for jobs where there were monetary expenses for introductory training. Our findings constitute new evidence on the heterogeneity of scarring effects on hiring chances. We further contribute to the literature by highlighting the role of transaction costs and labor market performance. [less ▲]

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See detailLe régime d’Etat providence joue un rôle dans le bien-être
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL; Brunel, Valentin

E-print/Working paper (2018)

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See detailThe Effects of Skills Underutilization and Unemployment on Hiring Decisions
Samuel, Robin UL; Sacchi, Stefan

Presentation (2018, January 23)

Research suggests negative effects of unemployment and skill underutilization on subsequent labor market outcomes. Among others, signaling theory has been used to explain why recruiters may evaluate ... [more ▼]

Research suggests negative effects of unemployment and skill underutilization on subsequent labor market outcomes. Among others, signaling theory has been used to explain why recruiters may evaluate competence and commitment of some job applicants less favorably than others. However, various country-, firm-, occupation-, and job-specific context factors may moderate such scarring effects. For example, a high youth unemployment rate may be associated with more scarring of previous unemployment spells and these effects might be different for occupations with different skill requirements. In this contribution, we explore the moderating role of transaction costs, i.e., the direct and indirect costs of recruiting and training new employees for scarring due to previous unemployment and skill underutilization. Furthermore, we investigate the extent to which the perceived difficulty of recruiting moderates these effects. Using data from a recent large-scale factorial survey of recruiters in four European countries (N~=~2,000) and employing multilevel linear regression models, we found, overall, scarring due to skill underutilization to exceed scarring due to unemployment. Skill underutilization was especially penalized when recruiting for a particular position was considered easy. Indirect transaction costs, particularly anticipated time required for organizational socialization, were negatively associated with unemployment scarring, but positively with scarring due to skill underutilization. Unemployment spells only had a negative effect on hiring chances, for jobs where there were monetary expenses for introductory trainings. Our findings constitute new evidence on the heterogeneity of scarring effects on hiring chances. We further contribute to the literature by highlighting the role of transaction costs and labor market performance. [less ▲]

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See detailSexual Dysfunction After Good-Grade Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Epprecht, Lorenz; Messerli, Michael; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in World Neurosurgery (2018)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the consequences of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) on sexual pleasure in patients with an otherwise favorable neurologic outcome. METHODS: Anonymous, standardized ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To assess the consequences of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) on sexual pleasure in patients with an otherwise favorable neurologic outcome. METHODS: Anonymous, standardized questionnaires concerning sexual function, including the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and a statement on subjective change in sexual pleasure after aSAH, were completed by 33 patients treated at the Cantonal Hospital St Gallen between 2005 and 2013. All had favorable neurologic outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale score 4 or 5). RESULTS: Ten patients (31.3%) reported a subjective worsening of sexual pleasure after aSAH. Sexual dysfunction according to FSFI criteria affected 9 of the 19 female patients (47.4%). All 19 women had a hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Erectile dysfunction was present in 7 of the 14 male patients (50%). Patients with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade 2 aSAH were significantly more likely to report a subjective worsening of sexual experience after hemorrhage than those with WFNS grade 1. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first known evaluation of sexual health following aSAH with otherwise favorable neurological outcomes, and confirms that sexual dysfunction is common in this population. Sexual health should be explored during follow-up with these patients [less ▲]

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See detailDifferent but Similar: Personality Traits of Surgeons and Internists. Results of a Cross-Sectional Observational Study
Stienen, Martin N.; Scholtes, Felix; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in BMJ Open (2018), 8(e02131),

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Medical practice may attract and possibly enhance distinct personality profiles. We set out to describe the personality profiles of surgical and medical specialties focusing on board-certified physicians. Design: Prospective, observational. Setting: Online survey containing the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), an international-ly validated measure of the Five Factor Model of personality dimensions, distributed to board-certified physicians, residents and medical students in several European countries and Cana-da. Differences in personality profiles were analyzed using MANOVA and Canonical Linear Discriminant Analysis on age- and sex-standardized z-scores of the personality traits. Single personality traits were analyzed using robust t-tests. Participants: The TIPI was completed by 2345 board-certified physicians, 1453 residents and 1350 medical students, who also provided demographic information. Interventions: None. Results: Normal population and board-certified physicians’ personality profiles differed (P<0.001). The latter scored higher on conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, but lower on neuroticism (all P<0.001). There was no difference in openness to experience. Board-certified surgical and medical doctors’ personality profiles were also different (P<0.001). Surgeons scored higher on extraversion (P=0.003) and openness to experience (P=0.002), but lower on neuroticism (P<0.001). There was no difference in agreeableness and conscientiousness. These differences in personality profiles were reproduced at other levels of training, i.e., in students and training physicians engaging in surgical versus medical practice. Conclusion: These results indicate the existence of a distinct and consistent average “physi-cian personality”. Despite high variability within disciplines, there are moderate, but solid and reproducible differences between surgical and medical specialties. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effects of Deskilling and Unemployment on Hiring Decisions
Samuel, Robin UL; Imdorf, Christian; Sacchi, Stefan et al

Scientific Conference (2017, November 08)

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See detailEidgenössische Jugendbefragungen ch-x: Lebensstile, Konsum und Zukunftsperspektiven junger Erwachsener in der Schweiz
Samuel, Robin UL

Speeches/Talks (2017)

Welches sind die aktuellen Wert-, Lebens- und Zukunftsvorstellungen von jungen Erwachsenen in der Schweiz? Welche Rolle nehmen die neuen Medien im Leben der ersten Generation der Digital Natives ein? Was ... [more ▼]

Welches sind die aktuellen Wert-, Lebens- und Zukunftsvorstellungen von jungen Erwachsenen in der Schweiz? Welche Rolle nehmen die neuen Medien im Leben der ersten Generation der Digital Natives ein? Was sind die Erwartungen der jungen Erwachsenen an Familie, Beruf, Religion und Freizeit? Eine neue Studie der Eidgenössischen Jugendbefragungen ch-x geht diesen Fragen nach. Sie stellt u.a. eine erstaunliche Trendstabilität bei den Grundwerten und bei der Einstufung der Wichtigkeit verschiedener Lebensbereiche fest. [less ▲]

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See detailFinding a job after precarious labour market experience. A cross-country factorial survey experiment with recruiters in Bulgaria, Greece, Norway and Switzerland
Imdorf, Christian; Shi, Lulu P.; Sacchi, Stefan et al

Scientific Conference (2017, September 01)

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See detailInstitutional Determinants of Early Job Insecurity in Nine European Countries: Country Report Switzerland
Imdorf, Christian; Shi, Lulu P.; Helbling, Laura et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

An overview of institutional determinants of early job insecurity in Switzerland.

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (5 UL)
See detailStili di vita, consumo e aspettative future dei giovani adulti in Svizzera
Berger, Lena; Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailLebensstile, Konsum und Zukunftsperspektiven junger Erwachsener in der Schweiz
Samuel, Robin UL; Berger, Lena; Bergman, Manfred Max

Book published by Somedia (2017)

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See detailAn International Comparative Analysis of Employers’ Hiring Decisions
Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL; Shi, Lulu P.

Presentation (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 UL)
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See detailHow Social Support and Self-Efficacy Moderate Effects of Significant Life Events on School Drop-Out in Young People
Burger, Kaspar; Samuel, Robin UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

Drivers of drop-out have been studied extensively over the past years. A number of studies suggest that self-efficacy and social support help reduce adverse effects of significant life events, such as ... [more ▼]

Drivers of drop-out have been studied extensively over the past years. A number of studies suggest that self-efficacy and social support help reduce adverse effects of significant life events, such as trouble with family and friends, on drop-out intention but also on actual drop- out. However, over-all, evidence as to whether self-efficacy and social support influence drop-out intention and actual drop-out is mixed. We examined whether, and to what extent, perceived social support and general self-efficacy affect drop-out of adolescents in transition to young adulthood. We distinguished between baseline levels of social support and self-efficacy and (within-person) change in social support and self-efficacy in order to determine whether drop-out is sensitive to fluctuations in social support and self-efficacy when person-specific levels of social support and self-efficacy are taken into account. Estimating growth curve models on TREE data, a panel study on the life trajectories of compulsory-school leavers in Switzerland, we found that baseline levels of social support and self-efficacy, as well as within-person change in social support and self-efficacy, affected adolescents’ drop-out intention, but did not prevent actual drop-out. Moreover, our models show effects of a range of significant life events on drop-out intention and actual drop-out. These findings improve our understanding of the role that psychological and social factors play in shaping drop-out intentions and actual drop-out [less ▲]

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See detailLebensstile, Konsum und Zukunftsperspektiven junger Erwachsener in der Schweiz
Berger, Lena; Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailStyles de vie, consommation et perspectives d’avenir des jeunes adultes en Suisse
Berger, Lena; Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2017)

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