References of "Marchiori, Luca"
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See detailThe EU-US Unemployment Puzzle Revisited: Institutions, Demography, and Capital Flows
Marchiori, Luca; Pierrard, Olivier; Sneessens, Henri UL

in Journal of Demographic Economics (2017)

The historical evolution of the EU-US unemployment rate gap is often explained in the literature in terms of asymmetric changes in labour market institutions. Population aging is another potential source ... [more ▼]

The historical evolution of the EU-US unemployment rate gap is often explained in the literature in terms of asymmetric changes in labour market institutions. Population aging is another potential source of asymmetry. Asymmetric population aging may generate international capital flows and have a substantial impact on relative unemployment rates. In this paper, we examine whether the combination of institutions, aging and capital flows explains the rise in the gap between 1960 and 2010. To this end, we set up a two-region overlapping generation model with search unemployment in which we introduce the historical and projected changes in labour market institutions and demographic evolutions. We show that asymmetric institutional changes alone can reproduce a large part of the historical rise in the unemployment gap. However, this result does not hold anymore once we add asymmetric aging in closed economies. We are nevertheless able to restore and even improve the initial result when we allow for international capital mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailImmigration, occupational choice and public employment
Marchiori, Luca; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

in Annales d'Economie et de Statistique = Annals of Economics and Statistics (2017)

This paper investigates the theoretical effects of immigration in an occupational choice model with three sectors: a low-skilled, a high-skilled and a public sector. The originality of our approach is to ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the theoretical effects of immigration in an occupational choice model with three sectors: a low-skilled, a high-skilled and a public sector. The originality of our approach is to consider (i) inter-sectoral mobility of labor and (ii) public employment. The combination of these two features yields a new mechanism by which immigration can have positive effects. The model demonstrates that immigration increases wages in the high-skilled and the public sectors, provided that the immigrant workforce is not too large and the access to public jobs is not too easy. The average wage of natives may also increase accordingly. Moreover, immigration may improve workers’ welfare in each sector. Finally, the mechanism underlying these results does not require complementarity between natives and immigrants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Impact of Unilateral Commitment on Transboundary Pollution
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Marchiori, Luca; Tabakovic, Amer et al

in Environmental Modeling & Assessment (2017)

To reach a common target of environmental quality, countries can choose to commit to a stream of pollution abatement right from the beginning of the game or decide upon abatement at each moment of time ... [more ▼]

To reach a common target of environmental quality, countries can choose to commit to a stream of pollution abatement right from the beginning of the game or decide upon abatement at each moment of time. Though most of the previous literature studies homogeneous strategies where no country or all countries commit to a (same) predefined policy, reality goes along a different way: some countries make more efforts than others to reduce pollutant emission. The main novelty of this paper resides in the introduction of this kind of heterogeneous strategic behavior currently observed among large pollution nations. We find that the pollution level can be lower under heterogeneous than under homogeneous strategies. A stringent environmental quality target will induce the committed player to produce an abatement effort that more than compensates the free-riding attitude of the non-committed player. [less ▲]

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See detailImmigration, occupational choice and public employment
Marchiori, Luca; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This paper investigates the theoretical effects of immigration in an occupational choice model with three sectors: a low-skilled, a high-skilled and a public sector. The originality of our approach is to ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the theoretical effects of immigration in an occupational choice model with three sectors: a low-skilled, a high-skilled and a public sector. The originality of our approach is to consider (i) intersectoral mobility of labor and (ii) public employment. We highlight the fact that including a public sector is crucial, since omitting it implies that low-skilled immigration unambiguously reduces wages and welfare of all workers. However, when public employment is considered, we demonstrate that immigration increases wages in the high-skilled and the public sectors, provided that the immigrant workforce is not too large and the access to public jobs is not too easy. The average wage of natives may also increase accordingly. Moreover, immigration may improve workers’ welfare in each sector. Finally, the mechanism underlying these results does not require complementarity between natives and immigrants. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and human capital in an endogenous fertility model
Pieretti, Patrice UL; Marchiori, Luca; Zou, Benteng UL

in Annales d'Economies et Statistiques (2010), 97/98

What is the impact of high-skilled migration on fertility and human capital in migrant's origin countries? This question is analyzed within an overlapping generations model where parents choose to finance ... [more ▼]

What is the impact of high-skilled migration on fertility and human capital in migrant's origin countries? This question is analyzed within an overlapping generations model where parents choose to finance higher education for a certain number of their children. It follows that families are composed of high-and low-skilled children who may both emigrate with a certain probability when they reach adulthood. It is found that a brain drain leads to a change in children's skill composition, with parents choosing to provide higher education to a larger number of their children. A calibration of the model suggests that, following a brain drain, the additional children benefiting from higher education might in the long run compensate for the loss of high-educated workers and lead to a brain gain. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain Drain, Remittances, and Fertility
Marchiori, Luca; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

in Journal of International Economics (2008)

This paper analyzes the effects of skilled migration and remittances on fertility decisions at origin. We develop an overlapping generations model which accounts for endogenous fertility and education ... [more ▼]

This paper analyzes the effects of skilled migration and remittances on fertility decisions at origin. We develop an overlapping generations model which accounts for endogenous fertility and education. Parents choose the number of children they want to raise and decide upon how many children obtain higher education. Only high skilled individuals migrate with a certain probability and remit to their parents. We find that an increase in the probability to emigrate leads both high and low skilled parents to send more children to obtain higher education. However the effect on the number of children is ambiguous. In a further analysis, we calibrate the model to match different characteristics of a developing economy. When the destination country relaxes the immigration restrictions, more high skilled individuals leave the origin country. The result is that, at origin, increased high skilled emigration reduces fertility and fosters human capital accumulation. [less ▲]

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