References of "Bronec, Jakub 50026416"
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See detailCVH Malach – Centrum vizuální historie Konference a workshop o novém přístupu a využití video databáze Fortunoff
Bronec, Jakub UL

in Marginalia Historica (2020)

On May 18, I took part in a very interesting workshop organized by the Malach Centre for Visual History at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the Charles University in Prague. This exceptional ... [more ▼]

On May 18, I took part in a very interesting workshop organized by the Malach Centre for Visual History at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the Charles University in Prague. This exceptional association provides local access to the extensive digital archives of the USC Shoah Foundation - the Institute for Visual history and Education (USC), the Refugee Voices archive of the Association of Jewish Refugees and the testimony collection of the Jewish Holocaust Centre in Melbourne. Nevertheless, the workshop focused on the newly incorporated Fortunoff Video Archive (FVA) that belongs to the category of long-awaited ingestion, and the path to get a licence was more than difficult. The archive represents a new source for all scholars including me, but in this short comment, I would like to critically point out to several minor drawbacks. [less ▲]

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See detailMUZEUM JAKO CESTA KE SMÍRU: Rozkol současné lucemburské židovské komunity
Bronec, Jakub UL

Article for general public (2019)

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See detailŽidé, identita, domov a rodinné dědictví
Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 01)

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See detailRepatriation Efforts – Luxembourg State Policy Towards Jews during World War II
Bronec, Jakub UL

in The EHRI Document Blog (2019)

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See detailTransmission of Collective Memory and Jewish Identity in Postwar Jewish Generations through War Souvenirs
Bronec, Jakub UL

in Heritage (2019)

The contribution includes a sample of testimonies containing the life stories of Jews born in the aftermath of World War II in two countries (Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg). At that time, Czechoslovak ... [more ▼]

The contribution includes a sample of testimonies containing the life stories of Jews born in the aftermath of World War II in two countries (Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg). At that time, Czechoslovak Jews were living through the era of de-Stalinization and their narratives offer new insights into this segment of Jewish postwar history that differ from those of Jews living in liberal democratic European states. On the basis of personal documents, photos, letters and souvenirs, the conducted interviews highlight an interesting way of maintaining personal memories in Jewish families and how this varies from one generation to the next. In my contribution, I am planning to illustrate the importance of these small artifacts for the transmission of Jewish collective memory. The case study aims to answer the following research questions: What is the relationship between the Jewish postwar generation and their heirlooms? Who is in charge of maintaining Jewish family heirlooms within the family? Are there any intergenerational distinctions in keeping and maintaining the family history? [less ▲]

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See detailŽidovský skauting během 2. světové války a v poválečném období v Československu a Francii
Bronec, Jakub UL

in Marginalia Historica (2019), 9(2),

Jewish scouting is a phenomenon that has not been properly investigated, even though Czechoslovak and French Jewish scouts used to work on hundred places in Czechoslovakia and France. Despite this fact ... [more ▼]

Jewish scouting is a phenomenon that has not been properly investigated, even though Czechoslovak and French Jewish scouts used to work on hundred places in Czechoslovakia and France. Despite this fact, we know very little about their membership, structure and roles. Besides the usual scout program, Jewish organizations in Czechoslovakia had something unique — Zionist education as a prerequisite for resettling their members in Palestine. This sociological phenomenon should be significantly paid attention, since first in history; scouting was seen as a wider base eligible to organize non-educational goals. Czechoslovak Jewish Scouting was in charge of preparing a young Jews to leave for Israel. On the other hand, Jewish French Scouts understood scouting as an organization, which enhanced an identification with the international Scout Movement. French Scout leaders did not undermine Jewish identity, but calls for stronger integration with the French nation. These tendencies were particularly evident in the French colonies (Oran and Tunis), where scouting largely replaced French civic education. Zionist ideas came out later together with Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Until that time, the French scouts had been guided by the slogan "Servir le judaisme et la France!" (I serve Judaism and France). The paper aims to illustrate the distinctions in the concept of Jewish scouting in France and Czechoslovakia. It concisely describes the activities of the Jewish Scout groups during World War II. In addition, the study reflects the rebuilding of Jewish Scouting after the war, especially the relationship of surviving Jewish scouts to their former homelands. [less ▲]

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See detailTransmission of Collective Memory nad Jewish Identity in Postwar Jewish Generations through War Souvenirs
Bronec, Jakub UL

in International 26th annual CIDOC - ICOM Conference in 2018 (2019)

My contribution includes a sample of testimonies containing the life stories of Jews born in the aftermath of World War II in two countries (Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg). At that time, Czechoslovakian ... [more ▼]

My contribution includes a sample of testimonies containing the life stories of Jews born in the aftermath of World War II in two countries (Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg). At that time, Czechoslovakian Jews were living through the era of de-Stalinisation, and their narratives offer new insights into this segment of Jewish postwar history that differ from those of Jews living in liberal democratic European states. Based on personal documents, photos, letters and souvenirs, the conducted interviews highlight an interesting way of maintaining personal memories in Jewish families and how this varies from one generation to the next. In my contribution, I am planning to illustrate the importance of these small artefacts for the transmission of Jewish collective memory. My presentation showcases people widely referred to as the “second and third Jewish generation”, their attitude to current notions of Jewish memory and self-perception and their role in society. Some had to live under totalitarian oppression, others had to face a wave of Jewish Sephardic immigrants coming from overseas – and witnesses admit that the arrival of these newcomers often caused difficulties in Jewish communities. Small objects from the war, often displayed in their households, serve as a reminder of their roots and destiny, which should not be forgotten. This paper is a part of my broader research project examining distinctions and similarities in identity formation through generations of Czech, Slovak, French and Luxembourgish Jews, who grew up either under communism or in liberal Western Europe. The aim is to create an international virtual library and cloud storage, not only for professional educators but also for the public. [less ▲]

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See detailNegotiating the past, present, and future: The Luxembourgish Jewish Museum Project as a Process of Contested memory and imagined futures
Badder, Anastasia UL; Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the ... [more ▼]

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the contestations and negotiations over meaning, representation, Jewishness, and the past, present, and future visions of community that arise in the development of a museum. Ongoing debates over which objects will be included in the museum, how they will be defined, how they will link to other sites of Jewish heritage around the city (through tours, performances, reference, etc.), as well as a hesitancy by many to donate family objects all point to issues around the construction of collective memory, communal cultural heritage, and multiple narratives of the past and how these are erased in the process of producing heritage as a series of museum objects. These debates also highlight concerns about how the contemporary community – which is multilingual, multinational, and multi-denominational – will be represented; in other words, who will be included in representations of the community and how will the contemporary community be defined, if at all? Finally, ongoing discussions around what will be emphasized or downplayed indicate the contested nature, not only of the past, but also of collective visions of the future as constituted through representations of heritage. In particular, negotiations over how to represent the Holocaust reflect a desire by some to fit the museum into developing narratives of cosmopolitanism, interfaith, and intercultural relations and a drive by others to represent family narratives and engage in a project ‘against forgetting’ in order to ensure a particular kind of future. And so, using this project as a case study, I seek to draw attention to the ways in which the construction of a heritage regime is at once a negotiation over narratives of the past, shared present identities, and collective visions of the future and the discourses and social processes at work within these debates. [less ▲]

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See detail8. výroční konference centra vizuální historie malach
Bronec, Jakub UL

Report (2019)

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See detailMezinárodní události očima lucemburských a československých židovských pamětníků
Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

The contribution is part of the dissertation entitled Cultural and Educational Activities of the Jewish Minority in Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg after World War II. Interviews completed the survey among ... [more ▼]

The contribution is part of the dissertation entitled Cultural and Educational Activities of the Jewish Minority in Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg after World War II. Interviews completed the survey among the members of the 2nd and 3rd Jewish post-war generations and the reflection of archival research. The study aims to point out different perceptions of international events (Judicial Process with Adolf Eichmann, Six-Day War, Operation Entebbe, Olympic Games in Munich 1972, etc.) within the differently influenced Jewish communities. Besides the comparative analysis of the answers, the attitudes of the narrators are confronted with the official attitudes and reactions of the then leading political leaders, both in Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg. In addition, the memoirs will include memories of the main representatives of the Jewish communities, both in Czechoslovakia and in Luxembourg. The selected individuals described vividly their cultural activity and work. The study itself is being developed within the Cotutelle bilateral program at the Université du Luxembourg and the Charles University. The dissertation is headed by Professor Denis Scuto and Dr. Petr Koura. [less ▲]

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