References of "Boll, Thomas 50000943"
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See detailComparative Evaluation of Models of Assistive Technologies’ Use
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional limitations and are at risk of losing their ability to live autonomously. Assistive Technology (AT) could help to reduce that risk. However, many older people don’t use ATs. Our presentation reviews existing models of ATs use, their applicability to specific types of AT, predictive value, fundamental elements, and critiques of such models. In systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar 46 papers were identified that met our inclusion criteria. 32 papers covered models of ATs use, applicability to special types of ATs, components of models, and their predictive value. 14 papers cover criticisms of models of AT use. We classified the models into two groups: The first included 11 models focusing on individuals’ mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires) as factors explaining ATs use; the second included 22 models that also considered contextual factors (e.g., social influence, physical environment) in addition to individuals’ mental states. Across both groups the most frequently included explanatory components were subjective norm and personal attitudes towards AT use, followed by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and then intention to use. Models were most frequently applied to information technologies followed by application to socially assistive robots. Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT2) and an extended version of Technology Acceptance Model showed the highest amount of explained variance in intention to use (56-74%) and an extended model of UTAUT in actual use of ATs (64%). We conclude with recommendations for further improvement of AT use models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (15 UL)
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See detailThe Reasons of Older people for the Use or Non-use of Assistive Technologies:
A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 06)

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT ... [more ▼]

The baby boomer generation is aging and the proportion of older people in the population is increasing. While people age, functional, cognitive, and physical problems increase. Assistive technology (AT) can help to overcome some activity limitations relevant to aging. Although ATs have potential benefits (e.g., to reduce the burden of caregivers, to increase independence), their usage rate is still low. Whereas several reviews of quantitative studies on factors of ATs use already exist, a systematic review of qualitative research about AT use is still missing. The aim of the current review is to provide more differentiated answers about what makes some older people use ATs while others not. Based on systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 18 relevant papers were identified according to our selection criteria. These studies were based on to self-reported reasons of older people for using or not-using diverse types of ATs designed for many different activities. We classified the key reasons as referring to three aspects: attributes of “potential technology users”, “context”, and “technology”. Perceived usefulness and attitudes towards use were the most common “personal” reasons and social impact by significant others was the most common “contextual” reason, and technology design was the most common “technological” reason influencing use or non-use of ATs. We discussed the identified reasons in relation to the major models of developmental self-regulation and action-theoretical approaches to development in age. Based on the current review, we generated methodological and theoretical recommendations for future research and for practical applications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (6 UL)
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See detailBarriers and facilitators for the use of assistive technologies for activities of daily living
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April)

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help ... [more ▼]

Many older people have functional impairments which increase their risk of losing the ability to live autonomously and to become dependent on care by others. However, assistive technologies (ATs) can help to overcome some limitations of activities of daily living and can thus be assumed to prevent, delay or reduce the need for personal long-term care as well as the burden on caring family members (e.g., spouses, adult children). Yet, the use rate of ATs is still rather low. This paper reviews positive effects of ATs and factors that influence their use. We performed systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google scholar databases. We found convergent results that the use of ATs for several kinds of activities of daily living such as self-care and mobility was associated with a reduced amount of self-reported personal (in particular informal) care hours. Regarding factors of ATs use, we found that feeling loneliness, cognitive impairments, and difficulty of use were some of barriers for the use of ATs. There is converging evidence that indicators of situation of need (in particular: disabilities in preforming self-care activities) are associated with an increased use of ATs. Slight to moderate functional limitations, chronic illnesses, and home-based training were some of the facilitators for the use of ATs. We concluded with recommendations for further improvement of studies relevant to ATs use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 UL)
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See detailScientific and legal concepts of care dependency: Role for understanding, emotional responding, and acting in the field of elder care
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

In this chapter, we analyze scientific and legal concepts of care dependency and explore their roles for understanding, emotional responding, and acting of various participants in the field of elder care ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we analyze scientific and legal concepts of care dependency and explore their roles for understanding, emotional responding, and acting of various participants in the field of elder care. First, two comprehensive concepts from the nursing sciences are contrasted. Then we compare a scientific and two legal concepts (restrictive vs. inclusive) of care dependency from the German long-term care (LTC) system, the last of which regulate older persons´ access to LTC benefits. Here, we consider their different implications for the risk of unmet psychological, social, and temporary care needs. Next, we examine the theoretical and methodological roles of different care dependency concepts for assessment as well as the analysis of prevalence, antecedents, consequences, and the management of care dependency. Following this, we explore possible functions of care dependency concepts as cognitive mediators of various agents’ activities related to elder care, which opens new topics for further research. Among these, we include the ascription of care dependency by various actors, older people´s self-presentation, and family carers´ presentation and LTC administrators´ evaluation of an older person´s care dependency. Further issues addressed are the education of professional care workers and professionals´ provision of elder care. Here, special attention is devoted to the implications of a shift from a restrictive to a more inclusive legal concept of care dependency as recently happened in Germany. Finally, we discuss the implications of inclusive legal concepts of care dependency for the improvement of elder care quality [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (15 UL)
Full Text
See detailCultures of care in aging
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

Book published by Information Age Publishing (2018)

Care for elderly persons has many facets and is influenced by many factors of the care-dependent person, the care giver(s) and the micro-, and macro-social context. A co-operation of multiple disciplines ... [more ▼]

Care for elderly persons has many facets and is influenced by many factors of the care-dependent person, the care giver(s) and the micro-, and macro-social context. A co-operation of multiple disciplines is required to better understand phenomena of elder care and to act adequately in this field. This is even more urgent given the increasing population aging and the impending gaps between demand and supply of care. The present book provides a first substantive integration of knowledge from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychologies to reach these goals —through a multi-disciplinary and international cast of authors. Macro-social context—including demographic, historical, political, normative, and other cultural factors—turned out to open and limit the available options for individual care giving and receipt and shapes how these issues are experienced by the participants in elder care. Elder care is shown to be far more complex than previously thought, because its consequences extend beyond single care givers to multigenerational caring families. Thinking, feeling and acting in relation to care dependency, caregiving and care receipt emerged as being influenced by multiple individual and social level factors. Future issues of elder care are seen as being shaped to a large extent by macro level factors such as population aging, social trends in job and family life, and development of assistive technologies. All this has far reaching implications for ensuring quality of care and the life quality on part of care recipients and care providers and for the coherence of social communities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (17 UL)
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See detailA systematic review of self-care assistive technologies for aging population
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These should become larger and more urgent in future, because ... [more ▼]

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These should become larger and more urgent in future, because the number of people 80+ is projected to more than double from 2010 to 2050 at least in EU and OECD countries. On the other side, there is a strong desire of older people, their relatives and policy makers to maintain the autonomy in old age as long as possible. In reaction to this, there have been strong social policy recommendations to develop and promote the use of assistive technologies (ATs). Whereas systematic reviews already exist for several other kinds of ATs, reviews about self-care ATs are still missing. Based on systematic literature searches in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 203 papers were identified of which 12 were included according to our selection criteria. The methodological quality of all the reviewed studies is evaluated. We reviewed findings on indicators of independent living as efficiency criteria as well as evidence about facilitators and barriers of using these technologies. Self-care ATs turned out to be efficient with respect to reduced care hours and increased independence level. The actual use of these ATs was associated with personal, contextual, and device factors. Lack of randomized control trial studies and a need for further research about ATs in several domains of self-care activities is revealed. Based on the findings of the current review, we generate recommendations for future research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (29 UL)
See detailCulture in the Act of Caring: Bringing Geropsychology, other gerosciences, and Cultural Psychology together
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

In the introduction of a multidisciplinary book on the role of culture in elder care the editors set the stage for a substantive integration of contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and ... [more ▼]

In the introduction of a multidisciplinary book on the role of culture in elder care the editors set the stage for a substantive integration of contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychology. The authors present arguments for a life-span developmental perspective on care for the elderly and extend this to geropsychology as subsection of life-span developmental psychology. They further emphasize that these disciplines consider to some extent the role of cultural and other contextual factors and that other gerosciences specialized on historical, political, health-and nursing-related aspects of elder care can further supplement this effort. Then three major streams of cultural psychology are mentioned which are particularly relevant to topics of caring: Dialogical Self Theory, Theory of Social Representations, and Cultural Psychology of Semiotic Dynamics. The authors conclude that an increasing population aging and growing gaps between demand and supply of care create a serious practical need for an integration of geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychologies to achieve a better understanding of the individual, interpersonal, and macro social processes involved in elder care. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (12 UL)
See detailCare in aging: Cross-fertilization within and between Geropsychology, other gerosciences, and Cultural Psychology
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

Care for elderly persons is multifaceted and embedded in a rich socio-ecological context of individual, micro-, and macro-social factors. This complexity requires multidisciplinary perspectives to better ... [more ▼]

Care for elderly persons is multifaceted and embedded in a rich socio-ecological context of individual, micro-, and macro-social factors. This complexity requires multidisciplinary perspectives to better understand phenomena of elder care and to act successfully in this field. In the final chapter of a multidisciplinary book with contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychology the editors draw conclusions about major topics, new insights, and further implications for research and practice. The conclusions refer to four domains. First, the macro-social context—including demographic, historical, political, normative, and other cultural factors—opens and limits the available options for individual care giving and receipt and shapes how these issues are experienced by the participants. Second, elder care at the individual and family level is far more complex than previously thought, due to differentiated individual and social care preferences and due to consequences extending beyond single caregivers to multigenerational caring families. Third, processes involved in formal and informal care turned out to be rather differentiated: Understanding, emotional responding, motivation and acting towards suffering, care dependency and caregiver burden are influenced by multiple individual and social level factors. Fourth, future issues of elder care are shaped by macro level factors such as population aging, social trends in job and family life, and technological developments with implications for ensuring care quality, care staff, culturally sensitive care, and assistive technologies. Cultural psychology emerged as a valuable partner of the gerosciences by contributing essentially to a deeper understanding of the aforementioned issues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (5 UL)
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See detailPsychologists and neoliberal school reforms: Multi-faceted problems calling for multi-faceted interventions
Boll, Thomas UL

in Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Sciences (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (11 UL)
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See detailEmotional ambivalence in adult children of care-dependent older parents: Heuristic impulses from cognitive-motivational emotion theories
Boll, Thomas UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Trans-generational family relations: Investigating ambivalences (2018)

Emotional ambivalence of adult children of care-dependent older parents is analyzed from the perspective of cognitive-motivational theories of emotion. Emotional ambivalence is conceived of as the co ... [more ▼]

Emotional ambivalence of adult children of care-dependent older parents is analyzed from the perspective of cognitive-motivational theories of emotion. Emotional ambivalence is conceived of as the co-presence of positive and negative emotions toward the multifaceted care situation involving these major elements: Multiple problems of the elderly parent, multiple caregiving tasks of the adult child, and multiple gains and losses for the elderly parent and for the adult child. In line with cognitive-motivational theories, positive and negative emotions are thought of as arising from mental comparisons between what adult children desire and what they believe with respect to the various facets of the care situation. Perceived fulfillment of such desires is assumed to lead to positive emotions (happiness, hope, moral pride, etc.) and perceived frustration to result in negative emotions (pity, fear, guilt, etc.) related to the elderly parent, oneself, or other family members. Because adult children usually have multiple desires (e.g., own welfare, welfare of older parent, welfare of other family members) which may be perceived as fulfilled in some areas and unfulfilled in others, various combinations of positive and negative emotions and thus emotional ambivalence is assumed to arise toward various aspects of the care situation. An illustrative application of this theoretical approach is given to a major care-related event, namely, the transition of an elderly parent to a nursing home. In conclusion, benefits for research and practice in the field of elder care (measurement, description, understanding, management, and positive functions of emotional ambivalence) are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (37 UL)
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See detailSelf-care Assistive Technologies: A systematic review of studies on efficiency and factors influencing their use
Abrilahij, Afsaneh UL; Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 05)

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity, as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These are expected to become more urgent in the future ... [more ▼]

A gradual decline in functional and mental capacity, as well as a growing risk of care dependency constitute major concerns of life in old age. These are expected to become more urgent in the future, because the old-age dependency ratio in the EU is projected to nearly double until 2060 due to demographic change. On the other side, there is a strong desire to maintain the autonomy of older people as long as possible. In reaction to this, there have been strong health and social policy recommendations across Europe to develop and promote the use of assistive technologies (ATs). Whereas systematic reviews already exist for several kinds of ATs, reviews about self-care ATs are still missing. Based on a systematic literature search in PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar databases 203 papers were identified of which 13 were included according to our selection criteria. The methodological quality of all the reviewed studies is evaluated. We reviewed findings on objective and subjective indicators of independent living as efficiency criteria as well as evidence about facilitating and inhibiting factors in the use of these technologies. Self-care ATs turned out to be efficient, with respect to care hours, independence level, and self-reported satisfaction. The actual use of these ATs was influenced by diverse personal, contextual, and device aspects. Lack of randomized control trial studies and the need for a further research about ATs in the diverse subdomains of self-care activities is revealed. Based on the findings of the current study, we generate recommendations for future research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (34 UL)
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See detailObituary: Dieter Ferring (1958-2017)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Boll, Thomas UL; Lang, Frieder R.

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2017), 30(4), 135-136

Memorializes Dieter Ferring, who contributed to life-span developmental psychology, geropsychology, and cultural psychology in research, teaching, professional practice, and political consulting. His life ... [more ▼]

Memorializes Dieter Ferring, who contributed to life-span developmental psychology, geropsychology, and cultural psychology in research, teaching, professional practice, and political consulting. His life work centered on life circumstances that included threats to people's well-being and on identifying and implementing solutions for such aversive conditions. His scientific approach was characterized by analysing phenomena in their micro and macro context, by interdisciplinarity, by emphasis on cognitive and semiotic mediation, and by using mixed-method approaches to data collection and analyses. Dieter Ferring had been much engaged in productive cooperations with researchers from other countries in Europe and in disseminating his insights and findings to study programs beyond his own field as well as to the general public. He also served as an expert and research partner to policymakers and community administrators and leaders in practical and applied fields. [less ▲]

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See detailGains and losses of caring for an older relative and the indication for geropsychological intervention
Ferring, Dieter UL; Boll, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

Caring for a close person involves and impacts several aspects and domains of personal life. A scenario that is often sketched here indicates that caring is physically exhausting, demanding time, leaving ... [more ▼]

Caring for a close person involves and impacts several aspects and domains of personal life. A scenario that is often sketched here indicates that caring is physically exhausting, demanding time, leaving no time for leisure, and excluding the carer from further social activities. In this view, caring is strain as it is clearly described by the concept of caregiver burden, and a risk for the psychological and/or physical health of family carers. But caring may also have another side of positive gratification and of fulfilment. To care for another person may represent a meaningful work for both the cared for and the caring person that may also go along with recognition and positive feedback from others. This is the starting point of the present study that addressed a sample of 151 informal carers (n = 111 female) with a mean age of 58 years (SD=14 years) with self-report questionnaire. The measure offered in a first part positive (n=35) and negative aspects (n=23) of caring for a close person and subjects had to rate how much they agree that these aspects are present in their own care giving relationship. Moreover, life satisfaction as well as positive and negative affect were assessed in a second part. Multivariate analyses by factor as well as cluster analyses showed different profiles of gains and losses that were systematically linked to indicators of subjective well-being. Findings will be discussed with respect to their implications for psychosocial intervention in the field of informal care. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (4 UL)
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See detailInterventions addressing subjective well-being in ageing: Promissing approaches on individual and societal level
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Poster (2016, June)

Subjective well-being (SWB) in aging is important not only as an indicator of positive aging, but also because of its effects on relevant outcomes for the person (e.g., health) and the community (e.g ... [more ▼]

Subjective well-being (SWB) in aging is important not only as an indicator of positive aging, but also because of its effects on relevant outcomes for the person (e.g., health) and the community (e.g., involvements). This raises the question of how SWB of older people can be improved through interventions. Our contribution focusses on three domains for improving SWB: Optimization of resources (e.g., financial situation, autonomy), help with critical life events (e.g., widowhood, disablement), and support at the end of life. We consider reasons for optimizing SWB in these areas as well as the theoretical and empirical foundation for interventions. Among them are (1) bottom-up approaches regarding the link between domain-specific SWB (e.g., regarding health, financial situation, social relationships) and global SWB, (2) Coping approaches to critical life events frequently occuring in old age (e.g., widowhood, disablement) and (3) research on terminal decline of SWB. Against this background principal possibilities of optimizing SWB in these domains are delineated and both individual and societal (e.g., communal, national) level interventions are described. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (6 UL)
See detailOpening: Concept of the book, goals and program of the workshop on cultures of care
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

Scientific Conference (2015, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (9 UL)
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See detailSocial policy measures for improving subjective well-being in later life: Issues of theoretical and empirical foundation
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2014, September 15)

Subjective well-being (SWB) in later life is important not just as an indicator of life quality, of mental health and of successful aging of older people, but also because of its effects on individually ... [more ▼]

Subjective well-being (SWB) in later life is important not just as an indicator of life quality, of mental health and of successful aging of older people, but also because of its effects on individually or socially relevant outcomes (e.g. health, social engagement). This raises the question about the extent to which and under what conditions SWB of older people can be improved by social policy measures (SPM). Our presentation examines theoretical and empirical issues related to answering this question. A first theoretical topic considers the relevance of bottom-up vs. top-down approaches conceptualizing the link between domain-specific satisfaction (e.g., with health, financial situation, social relationships) and global life satisfaction in old age. A second issue concerns the theoretical status of SWB in causal networks, i.e., SWB as consequence, as cause, as mediator and as moderator variable. A third topic refers to what can be derived from different theoretical approaches to SWB about whether and when SPM should have an effect of SWB in later life. Following that several empirical questions with respect to improving SWB of older people through SPM are considered. First, we discuss whether the present level of SWB in older adults (or subgroups thereof) indicates a demand for improving SWB. Second, we look at the importance of SWB for individually and socially desirable outcomes (e.g., on health, community involvement) by providing specific evidence which can provide further reasons for improving SWB through SPM. Third, we examine which life circumstances (e.g., financial situation, functional status), life events (e.g., becoming disabled) and individual activities (e.g., volunteering) are known to be significantly related to SWB and which of these conditions could principally be improved through SPM. Fourth, we discuss existing and needed empirical evidence for the effects of local, regional, national SPM on SWB in later life. We emphasize that past research has already produced an impressive body of knowledge relevant for improving SWB in older people through SPM, but that further theoretical and empirical efforts are needed to provide such SPM with a richer foundation. We conclude that better strategies for communicating results of research about SWB to policy makers should be elaborated so that these can have more impact on policy decisions about SPM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (22 UL)